The Briefly for May 28, 2020 – The “Can You Spare $9 Billion?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Farewell to Train Daddy for real, Mayor de Blasio continues to be content to not lead, one of the happiest places in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 64˚ High: 69˚
Overcast throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met.

Andy Byford, you’re gone for real. Train Daddy is headed to London to become their new Transport Commissioner. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

When New York City beings phase one of reopening, does the MTA have a plan to allow that to happen? We’ve heard multiple ideas floated in the last few months for the subways, but the MTA hasn’t yet put forward their plan on how to deal with construction and manufacturing workers returning to their jobs. Stephen Nessen and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Curbed puts it best: Did New York City just give up on public transit? (Alissa Walker for Curbed)

Got $9 billion to spare? New York could use it. The city’s budget is due by the end of June and with a $9 billion hole to crawl out of, things are likely to get worse before they get better. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Bobby Catone, the city’s biggest jackass. He plans on opening his Staten Island tanning salon to the public today in defiance of the governor’s orders. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

It seems that when people fled New York City, they also left behind their census forms. Also: An interactive map to see how you’re district is responding to the 2020 census. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The coronavirus layoffs are hitting Black households in New York harder than white households. 44% of Black households have seen a layoff compared to 27% of white households, but 84% of Black voters feared reopening too quickly compared to 59% white. There’s a reason for that fear, more than double the number of Black New Yorkers have died during the pandemic than white New Yorkers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Construction on “Little Island,” the two-acre park being built on Pier 55 is progressing ahead of its scheduled spring 2021 opening. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A bodybag protest was laid at the doorstep of city hall to show the plight of homeless New Yorkers, who crowd into the city’s shelters every night. Protesters demanded the city open up hotel rooms as an alternative to crowded shelters. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Okay, we’re all sick of cooking every meal for ourselves, right? Here comes WoodSpoon to allow you to order home-cooked meals prepared by out-of-work chefs. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The New York Public Library is considering curbside service at libraries. Reserve your book in advance and swing by a kiosk to pick it up. If it can happen at Best Buy without the pandemic, it can happen at the NYPL during it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

A look inside a plasma donation center, which the Times is calling “one of the happiest places in New York.” (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Beyond Sushi is opening a ghost kitchen in Long Island City. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

The city has offered very little in terms of help for restaurant and bar owners and has offered absolutely nothing in terms of a plan for reopening. Not only have they offered nothing in terms of help, but Mayor de Blasio is also stepping up enforcement of bars and restaurants in nine neighborhoods. Where the hell has the “Nightlife Mayor” been on this? Isn’t this a job specifically designed for them to be helping with? (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor’s response to this entire crisis has been to sit back and let other cities lead. Instead of leading the city’s help and support restaurants and bars and small businesses, he sits on his hands and watches. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

RIP Larry Kramer, whose activism helped shifted the nation’s policies towards AIDS. (Daniel Lewis for NY Times)

Have you become the master of your kitchen under quarantine? Are you ready for a challenge? Step up to the word’s stinkiest fruit, durian, and make some desserts with this dessert box available for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Attorney General Letitia James filed an amicus brief on Tuesday as part of a coalition of 14 attorneys general who are hoping to keep the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement out of courthouses unless they have a judicial warrant or court order. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

With budget cuts looming large, CUNY plans to continue online courses through the fall semester, with only a small fraction of courses and services offered in-person. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There is no specific place in the city to collectively grieve, but the Naming the Lost project has set up a memorial outside of Green-Wood Cemetery for people to post tributes to those who lost their lives to Covid-19. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

A few neighborhood restaurants and bakeries selling housemade sourdough starter by the ounce, cup, and jar. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“If we are going to make progress, we’ve got to address these things, and if this painful process is going to help us address this — there’s the yellow warbler!” –Christian Cooper on the Central Park incident, racism, his thoughts on Amy Cooper, and birdwatching in Central Park. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

After the Central Park Karen story, State Assemblymember Felix Ortix and State Senator Brian Benjamin have introduced a new bill that would criminalize falsely reporting an incident to police and make the offense eligible for hate crime status. (Zack Linly for The Root)

Yesterday I made mention that Governor Cuomo was headed to DC to talk President Trump into helping the state’s infrastructure projects. He came back and declared good government “extinct” in America. I’m not a political scientist, but I’m not sure that’s a good sign. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Interactive Map: New York City’s wisteria is in bloom, here’s where to see it. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Ruben Diaz, Sr. is an opponent of same-sex marriage and women’s reproductive rights and is also a Democrat. What does it mean to be a Democrat in New York City? (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

How to get hired as a contact tracer in NYC and what the job entails. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The state’s legislature has effectively killed the rent cancellation bill, taking up a “totally inadequate” bill instead. In its place is a bill that gives landlords vouchers if a landlord’s tenants must earn 80% below an area’s income anad have been paying more than 30% of their household income on rent before March 30. The total budget would give 50,000 tenants two monthly vouchers of $1,000. For perspective, one-quarter of the city’s 5.4 million renters did not pay rent last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The numbers have slowed, but not enough for reopening. A look into who are the New Yorkers who are getting sick? (Andy Newman for NY Times)

Okay, what is going on with “The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York,” being surreptitiously placed on the bookshelf in nearly every cable news interview? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

A somewhat complete (for now) guide to beach food at Rockaway Beach. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The latest openings, reopenings, takeout specials, and other exciting or noteworthy updates in the weekly restaurant update from The Infatuation. (Hannah Albertine for the Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 15, 2020 – The “Quarantining with a Ghost” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Understanding the state’s reopening plans, what rooftop bars may look like on reopening, make a real NYC bagel, the best hospitals, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 79˚
Drizzle in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 54˚ High: 75˚

A beginner’s guide to understanding New York’s reopening plan. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The City Council’s bill capping fees restaurant delivery apps can charge tops out at 20% and it’s waiting for Mayor de Blasio’s signature. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Let the true 2021 mayoral race begin, as Scott Stringer makes an off-handed remark about Corey Johnson’s predilection for dancing in public. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Happy 100th birthday to Louise Ceci Jacobson, who celebrated with a drive-by parade. (Carlotta Mohamed for amNewYork Metro)

45% of U.S. adults believe in ghosts, but how many of us believe we are quarantining with a specter ? (Molly Fitzpatrick for NY Times)

asian-veggies.com a new Asian produce delivery service in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

Over 100 city kids have PMIS, the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, which may be linked to Covid-19. Seventeen total states and six European countries have reported cases and there have been three deaths from PMIS in New York state so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Trump’s playbook seems to be ‘Ford To City: Drop Dead’ (Paul Blumenthal for HuffPost)

Video: There’s the National Debt Clock, there’s the actual clock in Union Square, and now add the Trump Death Clock in Times Square to the city’s list of infamous clocks. (HuffPost)

Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, the couple charged with a hate crime for allegedly attacking a group of Hasidic men, argue that they are the real victims because the men the allegedly attacked were not social distancing. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Let’s take a moment to celebrate anything that brings us an inch closer to the way life was before mid-March. Dunkins across the city have begun reopening. (Give Me Astoria)

What will dining look like once we’re back? A look to California may provide some answers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

An unnamed “famous Upper East Side bar and lounge” and a “trendy downtown hotel” have both supposedly held speakeasy parties this week. A risky move, considering the Post already found out, so city officials can’t be too far behind. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Video: Another disturbing NYPD arrest, this time it’s a 22-year-old mother being violently arrested while walking with her toddler. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You’d be surprised how NYC hasn’t changed int he last century from this aerial photograph from 1933. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Broken machines, staff shortages, a lack of bilingual interpreters, and polling locations that weren’t accessible to the disabled. A report released Thursday by City Comptroller Scott Stringer found “widespread mismanagement and lax recordkeeping” by the city Board of Elections in last year’s general election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals – Metropolitan came out on top of Leapfrog’s list of the best and worst hospitals in NYC. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Twenty community clinics will now make free coronavirus testing available to all people showing symptoms, with an additional 12 clinics scheduled to be added to that list. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Followup to the story about Dr Oxiris Barbot, the city’s health commissioner, and a comment she made to Terence Monahan, the NYPD Chief of Department, Dr Barbot has already apologized. Ed Mullins, the head of the NYPD’s union who is the subject of an NYPD Internal Affairs probe, continues to push on Twitter, having called Dr Barbot a “bitch.” It’s time to move on Ed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Will rooftop bars still be a thing this summer? Here’s a what they could look like. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

This is NYC’s biggest asshole, who thought dumping a Rubbermaid container of cereal and milk on the subway would be funny. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Shopsin’s is back at Essex Market. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The schedules for virtual Brooklyn and Queens Pride Month events have been released. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Community health centers in the city will receive $22 million in emergency funds from the federal government to bolster coronavirus testing capacity. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Ahead of expected budget cuts, CUNY is looking to cut its budget by $10 billion, with adjunct professors first on the chopping block. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The meat shortage,” as explained by the city’s meat suppliers. (Kitty Greenwald for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio appointed at least 80 donors to advisory groups that were formed to help shape New York City’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. There are a total of 330 people appointed to the groups. (Anna Sanders for NY Daily News)

As the city creeps towards a reopening, beauty salon owners don’t feel like they have a seat at the table. Maybe they should have donated more to the mayor? (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Frozen on Broadway is closed. The show will not reopen once Broadway returns. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The head of the city’s contract tracing program is the same person who gave Mayor de Blasio advice in March that there was “no proof that closures will help stop the spread,” and believed that large events should have continued as planned. This was happening while the mayor’s top health officials were threatening resignation in protest if the mayor didn’t listen to them. (William K. Rashbaum, J. David Goodman, Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

10 ways for adding more plants in your NYC apartment. (Localize.City)

This weekend’s project? Make real New York-style bagels at home. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 21, 2020 – The “Mayor de Blasio Wants You to Snitch” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All public events in June are canceled, the best Indian takeout and delivery options, the NY Times discovers studio apartments in quarantine and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

A pilot program to bring on-site health services and expanded COVID-19 testing to residents of NYCHA will roll out this week, according to Governor Cuomo. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The country’s most expensive sushi restaurant now has a takeout option to match. Masa is selling an $800 box of sushi or sashimi every Friday. It will feed four people and you have to assemble it yourself. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to snitch on your fellow New Yorkers for not socially distancing. “I’m sorry this is not snitching.” -Mayor de Blasio. On a serious note, report people or plaes that are promoting something that is creating an unsafe condition. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The mayor may not have the authority to close the schools or make rulings over the subways, but he does have the ability to cancel public events and Mayor de Blasio has canceled all public events in June. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The New York City LGBTQ Pride March: Canceled. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Shakespeare in the Park: Canceled. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Half Marathon: Canceled. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival: Canceled. Is this going to be a year without festivals in NYC? (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Coney Island Mermaid Parade: Postponed. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The federal government’s $350 billion funding for small businesses ran out last week, calling attention to larger businesses that received checks, like Shake Shack’s $10 million. Shake Shack announced it would be giving that $10 million back after public outrage was pointed in their direction. (Zachary Warmbrodt for Politico)

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, described as the third-best steakhouse in every second-tier city in America, has 150 locations, $86 million in cash reserves, and also received a forgivable $20 million loan from the federal government, making sure businesses who need those loans will never get them. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

How do you demolish a 52-story building in Manhattan? Very slowly. 270 Park Avenue’s 707-foot-tall building is being demolished to make way for a massive 1,425-foot-tall building. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

The NYC Human Rights Commission is launching a team to respond to COVID-19 discrimination and harassment, as reports of racism against Asians surge in the city. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s statistics are being criticized because a new hate crime category titled “Other Corona” hides the increase in biased-based attacked on the Asian community in New York. Multiple groups have stepped up to collect reports of harassment and racist incidents. (Ese Olumhense, Rachel Holliday Smith, Ann Choi and Christine Chung for The City)

It’s the size of a football and for $20, it can full of a mixed drink and yours with a straw. A refill is only $15. (EV Grieve)

The city opened five new COVID-19 “walk-in” test centers that will prioritize patients older than 65 with preexisting medical conditions who live in areas of the city that have been disproportionately affected by the spread of coronavirus. “Walk in” is in quotes because it’s not a drive-through test center. You still need an appointment to get a test. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Imagine the indignity of the choices that the 1% have to make in these very trying times. They have to choose between quarantining with their household staff or, get this, doing their own chores. (Dennis Lynch for The Real Deal)

Are you real for virtual dating? (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

Where to get Indian delivery and takeout. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If your neighbor tests positive for COVID-19, does your landlord have to tell you? There’s nothing that legally compels them to. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

I don’t think the New York that we left will be back for some years.”- Gregg Bishop, commissioner of the city’s small businesses agency. Thank you for your optimism Gregg. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The Times looks at New Yorkers self-isolating in studio apartments, including a couple paying $2,300 for a 237 square foot studio apartment. (Penelope Green for NY Times)

Welcome to New York Sabrina Ionesco, the first overall pick in the WNBA draft, who will be playing for the Liberty. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Food critic Ryan Sutton’s 15 favorite takeout and delivery options (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Xan for today’s featured photo of “Invisible Man: A Memorial to Ralph Ellison”.