The Briefly for December 13-14, 2020 – The “Second Wave” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining shuts down on Monday, stay the night at FAO Schwarz, a Manhattan sushi delivery guide, Mayor de Blasio makes a threat, and more

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 60˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tonight is the peak of the Geminid meteor shower for those in the darker areas of the city with “relaxed” eyes with up to 120 meteors per hour. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Rendering: A look at the giant apartment complex coming to Coney Island, complete with roof pool, in the old Gargiulo’s Restaurant parking lot of.

The Tompkins Square Park Holiday tree is lit. (EV Grieve)

The state’s pension fund will divest from many fossil fuels in the next five years and sell its shares in other companies that contribute to global warming by 2040. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Looking for an interesting place to spend a night in the city? You can Airbnb FAO Schwarz for a night. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here’s an explanation of the NYC Sheriff’s office, because if you’re confused about the distinction between the NYPD and the NYC Sheriff, I don’t blame you. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A guide to the Victorian mansions of Flatbush. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Two officers lied in paperwork and in court about their arrest of a Black Lives Matter protester in 2016. Manhattan DA Cy Vance’s office cleared them of perjery. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

Where to go ice skating in Brooklyn this winter. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

If you never stepped inside CBGB, this virtual version of the club from 2006 will be the closest you’ll ever get. Yes, it includes the bathrooms. (Alex at Flaming Pablum)

DCLA and Borough Arts Council funded artist and cultural organizations, venues, or institutions to be able to utilize public outdoor spaces for ticketed events and performances starting on March 1 thanks to a new Open Culture bill passed by the City Council. The maximum charge for a program will be $20. This will be the first ticketed live entertainment legally allowed in the city since March 2020. The Open Culture program is an extension of the Open Restaurants, Open Streets, and Open Storefronts programs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’re feeling like you just have to get out of the city for good, may I suggest Topeka, Kansas, which will pay you $10,000 if you are a remote worker and move there. There are many cities that will pay you to move there. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Kathleen Casillo was charged with reckless endangerment after she drove her sedan into a crowd of ICE protesters in Murray Hill on Friday, sending six people to the hospital. Casillo says she panicked and hit the gas when protesters were banging on her car. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It seems New Yorkers got an early jump on buying Christmas trees this year. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

If you’ve had your usual Christmas plans canceled, this year presents a great opportunity to shake things up and join the Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count. Don’t lie, you’ve loved following this year’s bird news. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Max Rose, fresh off a defeat for Congress, filed paperwork to run for mayor. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The Google Doc of holiday light displays, that everyone could edit as they please, from Time Out has been updated into an interactive map. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Manhattan sushi delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)


The city is well beyond its thresholds for new hospitalizations, the 7-day average of new cases, and the 7-day rolling positivity average. “This is clearly a second wave in New York City” -Mayor de Blasio. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The governor has shut down indoor dining in the city (again) starting Monday the 14th, thanks to an increase in every single Covid-19 metric the state and city have established. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

Eight hospitals in the city have reached more than 90 percent fullness in their ICUs. Flushing Hospital in Queens is at over 100% capacity. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Only 1.4% of the state’s Covid-19 spread comes from restaurants and bars, but that number doesn’t specify between indoor and outdoor dining. 73.84% of COVID-19 cases spread through private gatherings. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The reactions from restaurant owners ranges from sad, but understanding, to absolutely delusional. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

“Anyone who thinks that their privilege puts them ahead of other people in greater need, that’s not going to happen in New York City.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An ultra-Orthodox synagogue in Williamsburg seems to have broken social distancing rules for the last time. The mayor stated this week that the city will “move to shut down the building once and for all” after a funeral on Monday brought hundreds of people into the building with no masks. The article threads the needle between the recent Supreme Court case the state lost about religious gatherings and the rules that are still in place regardless of the lawsuit. But also this is a threat coming from Mayor de Blasio, who regularly ignores his own deadlines and threats. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House liquor license has been suspended, finally. It was one of 23 city businesses whose licenses were suspended last week. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Monarch is also on the list of businesses whose liquor licenses were suspended after city sheriffs broke up a party with nearly 400 people inside. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Gravesend, which has the highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city clarified when outdoor dining can remain open during snow and when snow removal is happening. When a Winter Operations Advisory is given, outdoor dining will stay open, but during a Snow Alert, outdoor dining will close. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

How scientists are tracking the flow of the city’s Covid-19 outbreak, using your poop. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

A day in the life of a contract tracer. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Find your public school’s Covid-19 testing rate online. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The New York City Board of Health passed a measure extending the order for total mask compliance at every school in the city, not just public schools for students, staff, and faculty. Yes, before this order, there was no enforcement of masks in non-public school buildings. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of Fortitude, the NYPL lion, dressed for the season, and the pandemic.

The Briefly for November 10-12, 2020 – The “2.26% Positive” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: What Biden’s win could mean for NYC, the Staten Island Yankees are dead, the Fountain of the Fairs has been restored, school’s cool, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.

Non-white city workers make less than their white counterparts according to a new report from the City Council. Unsurprisingly, men also earn more than women. (Sydney Periera for Gothamist)

Interview: Mike Fadem from pizza place Ops wants you to order salad and wine with your pizza. (Noëmie Carrant for RESY)

Photos: I love these old photos from clubs in the city back in the 90s. Photos from Tunnel. (Daniela Kirsch, photos by Steve Eichner for Patch)

How safe are the outdoor elaborate dining enclosures that are popping up across the city, turning outdoor dining into enclosed outdoor dining? “You’re actually creating an environment where the virus is within the enclosure.” -Dr. Abraar Karan, Harvard Medical School. (Winnie Hu and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

One of the city’s oddball museums, the KGB Museum, is being forced to close. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

After being damaged in Superstorm Sandy, the interactive mist garden Fountain of the Fairs has been restored at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to volunteer and donate this holiday season. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Apartment Porn: A $26.5 million full-floor Chelsea penthouse apartment. Take a video tour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Photos: NYC celebrates Donald Trump losing his job. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Sachyn Mital for BrooklynVegan)

More photos: Even more celebrating. (John Del Signore, photos by Scott Heins, Scott Lynch, Roy Rochlin, CS Muncy, and Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

Even more photos: Celebrations continued over Biden’s victory. (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Even much more photo: Astoria celebrates. (Christina Santucci for Queens Post)

Five takeaways for what Biden’s win could mean for the city. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Biden’s victory also means good news for NYC’s transportation infrastructure. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Starting on December 1, two-way tolls are coming to the Verrazzano Bridge. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

AriZona Iced Tea is stepping up to help Momma Zee’s Food To Plez Deli. Momma Zee’s is the 1st woman & black owned bodega in NYC since 1987 and is in danger of closing due to the pandemic. Their Go Fund Me has AriZona Icea Tea matching up to $25,000. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Rockefeller Center ice skating rink will be open this year on a condensed schedule to give restaurants as much time as possible in the sunken plaza. Skating returns on November 21 through January 16. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city’s absentee ballots will begin to be counted this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Starting on Wednesday night at 6:30 pm, The Public Theater will use their facade as a canvas for the exhibit “SAY THEIR NAMES,” a panoramic view of Black lives killed by the police between 2013 and present day, curated by Garlia Cornelia Jones and features the work of ten artists. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Amaury Abreau, a nine-year NPD veteran, was indicted along with four co-conspirators in Brooklyn federal court on Monday for playing a key role in a multinational cocaine trafficking ring. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

As expected, the Staten Island Yankees are dead. The Yankees ended their affiliation with the team after Major League Baseball limited the number of teams each team could have. There’s a chance that an unaffiliated Atlantic League team could fill the gap. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Staten Island could be the city’s next Covid-19 hotspot. The 10307 zip code, Tottenville, is sitting at a 6.57% positivity rate for the last week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s not just Tottenville, a second wave of Covid-19 in NYC is looming. (Joseph Goldstein and Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

The interactive Covid-19 map by zip code is back. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s been six weeks since indoor dining resumed and with a city-wide 2.26% positivity rate, Mayor de Blasio is calling for it to be reevaluated. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Speaking of the 2.26% positivity rate, we are inching closer and closer to NYC’s 3% threshold for a citywide school closure. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

If schools remain open, it’s gonna be a chilly winter in classrooms. The Department of Education’s plans for the winter are to keep windows open for ventilation. It’s almost like sending kids back to school was something we’re prepared for. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

14 restaurants for a Thanksgiving meal. (Beth Landman for Eater)

Thanks to reader @directorchick for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 6, 2020 – The “NYC is Horny for Books” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the mayor firing Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the MTA’s bad options to continue operating, where to eat in Queens, can you afford an apartment, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 81˚
Rain overnight.

Liquored up ice cream is now legal in New York. The new liquor ice cream can be alcoholic up to 5% by volume. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photos and Video: Inside an abandoned Brooklyn warehouse and a look at the treasures left behind. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

In parts of the city, the fireworks stopped shortly after July 4. Apparently Norwood didn’t get the message because there was a 45-minute fireworks display over the weekend in a memorial for James Wimmer, who was a lifelong resident, on what would have been his 45th birthday. In 45 minutes, how many police showed up? Exactly zero. (Norwood News)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to know that he fired Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the city’s former health commissioner, and she did not resign in protest. Yes, it makes total sense to fire your top health official in the middle of a health crisis. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city’s libraries’ grab-and-go service has proven one thing: New Yorkers are horny for reading. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Why did Mayor de Blasio push Dr. Oxiris Barbot out in the middle of a pandemic? He says he wants the “atmosphere of unity.” Nothing says unity like people quitting your administration in frustration and forcing out the top health official in the middle of a health emergency. That must also be why you keep around NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, who shit talks in public. Bill, we all know you’re a simp for cops. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are six botanical gardens you can visit in the city this summer. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A look through the archives of the Brooklyn Eagle at Irving Kaufman’s photography, with a focus this week on NYC construction in the 1930’s. (Phil Kaufman for Brooklyn Eagle)

RIP Pete Hamill, a celebrated NYC reporter whose work was featured in nearly any publication you can name. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

There were still nearly 100,000 customers without power after Tropical Storm Isaias on Wednesday night as ConEd reports it may take days to restore power across the city. Governor Cuomo directed the Department of Public Service to investigate ConEd’s response to the storm. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you thought that the city’s bootleg bartenders selling drinks from coolers was going to dwindle in the pandemic, you’re wrong. (Avery Stone for Eater)

With Isaias fresh in mind and with repairs from Hurricane Sandy still going, it’s a good time to examine the loopholes that allow home sellers from disclosing if their home may flood or not. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Where to get takeout and delivery in Queens, updated for August. (Eater)

It’s like a “Why I’m leaving New York” personal essay, but it’s about a restaurant. Why the Banty Rooster is leaving New York. (Matthew Sedacca with Delores Tronco-DePierro and John DiPierro for Grub Street)

The city will be installing checkpoints to identify out-of-state travelers who are required to quarantine and handing out fines up to $10,000 for violations. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced firings of 79 employees, 181 furloughs, and 93 voluntary retirements. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

This is a good link to have when someone asks you if you think they can afford an apartment in NYC: What is a good rent-to-income ratio in NYC. I’ve always used the 40:1 rule, but this goes a bit deeper. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

“If you’ve never been to courts in New York City, even the newest buildings are teeming with people and their germs. Just to call a single case, there have to be at least 10 people in the room. One judge. One clerk. One court reporter. Four court officers. One prosecutor. One defense attorney. One person who stands accused of a crime and possibly their family members. So when OCA tells us that it will only have 10 cases on at once, that doesn’t mean just 10 people confined to one courtroom, but many, many more, all at risk of contracting and spreading the same virus that killed so many, including my colleague.”
-Martha Lineberger, public defender for the Legal Aid Society, Lives Hang in the Balance as Courts Resume In-Person Work for City Limits

Welcome to the first day after Governor Cuomo’s eviction moratorium is over. Without protections form the state, this could be the start of mass evictions and a huge jump in preventable homelessness in the city. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

NYC will dedicate a team of contact tracers to investigate coronavirus cases in schools, but based on the city’s contact tracing program so far (reminder: the NY Times called it a “disaster”), don’t get your hopes too high. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Go home, NY Times, you’re drunk. Headline: New York’s Sidewalk Prophets Are Heirs of the Lascaux Cave Artisans (Seph Rodney for NY Times)

According to RentHop’s rental report, rents dropped 5% year-over-year in Manhattan. (RentHop)

A rundown of all of the bad options the MTA has now that it seems clear that the federal government is not going to be helping and congestion pricing isn’t happening anytime soon. Reduced service with raised fares? Check. Signal upgrade delays? Check. Shelving new construction? Check. It’s like a Choose Your Own Adventure book, but every choice past page one is bad. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best places to eat sushi outside” is a very 2020 headline. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)