The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for August 2, 2019 – The “Delayed Subways Are Literally Killing You” Weekend Edition

A highlight of the city’s beaches, the weekend subway delays, photos of children are in the NYPD’s facial recognition database and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to August, when everyone seems to leave the city.

Lots of reduced service this week on the subways, check before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Four residential towers slated for Two Bridges, the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges on the Manhattan side, was put on ice by a judge who declared the city did not have the right to bypass the usual zoning and approval process. (amNY)

There’s a piece of Broadway’s history sitting outside of 52 East 80th Street. Outside the brownstone, you’ll find a large limestone head of a Greco-Roman goddess. That head was a part of the original Zigfield Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Are subway delays deadly? In the long run, yes. The Social Science Research Council found a correlation between higher commute times and obesity and are linked to diabetes and heart conditions. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You can take the mayor out of the city, but you can’t take the controversy away from the mayor. During this week’s debates, de Blasio was plagued with questions and protests over some of his greatest hits. (amNY)

Who is on the MTA board, which has the authority to raise prices and make service changes? If you guessed a bunch of rich, older, white suburbanites, you’d be right. The median household income for a board member is 5x MTA riders and only 26% live in the city. (6sqft)

Three men were arrested for trafficking 100,000 pounds of weed from California to Queens between 2015 and last December. (QNS)

Video: Meet Danny and Elizabeth Rossi, a father/daughter dup of disabled veterans who run hot dog carts outside the Met. Their interview highlights their infectious personalities but also the surprising black market hot dog cart business. (Viewing NYC)

The proper way to end a subway argument about etiquette is yelling, followed by one person leaving the subway car to go to the next car at the first opportunity, not stabbing two people who are asking you to move your bags. (Gothamist)

A side effect of the eventual East River Park renovation is that the blacktop area frequented by street hockey players and skaters would be turfed over to make way for the displaced East River Park’s baseball fields. The city is trying to figure out where it would move the displaced skaters and street hockey players. (Gothamist)

The MTA plans to make the 14th St station on 6th and 7th Aves fully accessible with new elevators by 2022. (6sqft)

The NYPD has quietly added photos of children and teens to their facial recognition systems, further graying an already very gray area of where artificial intelligence and policing meet. (NY Times)

The monster under the streets of Bushwick is hungry, that’s the only logical explanation for the giant sinkhole that opened up and nearly ate a car whole. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city says its lead paint problem is under control, meanwhile, over 900 classrooms for children under 6 had deteriorated, chipped, or peeling lead paint. That’s one in five classrooms. (Gothamist)

This fall the Brooklyn Bridge will go under a $328 million renovation project to work on the facades and repoint the towers. (Downtown Express)

Jesus Cepeda was killed in midtown when a driver hit him with his SUV while double parking in reverse. No arrests were made. (Gothamist)

Researchers studying trees at Green-Wood Cemetery found a nonnative beetle previously unknown to science. (NY Times)

A series of projects meant to beautify and make Downtown Brooklyn safer for pedestrians was announced by the governor on Thursdays to bring pedestrian crossings, a renovation for the Walt Whitman Library, upgrades in Commodore Barry Park, and more. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is one story of hundreds from migrant children separated from their parents at the border, who end up in New York City. (Gothamist)

Borough President Eric Adams called out the city’s third-party transfer program as racist and taking homes away from black and brown homeowners is intentional. (Bklyner)

The GOAT Riverside Park goat? After an online poll, Massey, a father of four was declared victorious. After a brief vacation, the goats are back to manicure the park. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

Eat your way through Coney Island. (amNY)

Today’s featured image was sent in by reader @munnybuns

The Briefly for May 24, 2019 – The “Human Rights Violations by the MTA” Edition

How to get around and what to eat and drink Memorial Day weekend, the ACC is looking for people to hang out with dogs, commuting from the suburbs sucks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about getting around in NYC during Memorial Day weekend, including all of the normal weekend disruptions that bleed through to Monday. (6sqft)

If you love dogs but can’t have one in your apartment, here’s a compromise. The city’s Animal Care Centers is looking for people who take a shelter dog out for some fun for a few hours. Go to the park to play, go for a long walk with your new best friend, go for a car ride, or a dog-friendly restaurant, it doesn’t matter. Give one of these dogs a break from shelter life. It’s all part of the “BoroughBreak” program, which starts up this weekend. (amNY)

This is the jackass pulling the emergency brakes on the subways. (amNY)

The MTA is on the verge of a state human rights violation by constantly failing to install elevators. In the words of the judge “There has to be action, no more talk.” (Gothamist)

A Brooklyn Community Board bought a $26k SUV, which just so happened to have its own parking space across the street from the board’s manager Gerald Esposito. Why did they buy it? “To go different places.” (The City)

Your guide to the food at Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

The Queens Zoo has two new fluffy babies in Brienne and Benny, a pair of Andean bears. (amNY)

What makes you a regular? Weekly visits? A drink named after you? “The usual?” (NY Times)

Cellino & Barnes, the comedy, is coming to Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

“When one attorney refused to acquiesce, respondent Barnes called him a ‘f—ing coward and vowed that respondent Barnes ‘will remember this.” Here’s a history on the infamous breakup of two NYC famous lawyers. (The Cut)

The Port Authority is drowning in people and buses and something has to change. (Curbed)

If you’re flying out of Newark this weekend, sorry to hear it, but here’s a list of where to eat in EWK. (Eater)

It’s Memorial Day weekend. Let’s start worrying about hurricanes. (Patch)

The 7 train has been literally falling apart, but the MTA doesn’t think that danger is enough to put netting under the platforms to protect the cars below. (The City)

The city’s libraries need about $35 million in additional funding, but they received an $11 million cut from Mayor de Blasio. This is poor timing because the libraries are expected to play a big part in the 2020 census, which the mayor claims to be a priority. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Welcome to the Mr. Jones Supper Club, the city’s most exclusive dining experience. (Great Big Story)

Over a quarter million people move out of the city every year and move to the suburbs, where they find that their commutes still suck. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson has put a bill forward that is a ten-year roadmap to breaking the city’s car culture. (Curbed)

Penn Station, the city’s festering exit wound,” sucks, but here are a few tips to make it a slightly less nightmarish hellscape. (Gothamist)

The state’s legislature says it’s time to end the state’s ban on “gravity” knives. The governor has vetoed similar bills twice, but with evidence that the law is selectively enforced against people of color and a recent judge called it “unconstitutional,” he may sign it into law this time. (Patch)

Here’s news you don’t want to hear. Some of the city’s water fountains contain up to 50x the federally allowed amount of lead. 4.5% of early tests came back positive for lead. The entire city is scheduled to be tested by June 14. (Gothamist)

Diners have been an important part of the city for decades, but real estate developers and rising costs of rent have been poisoning diner culture and they’re in danger of disappearing. (NY Times)

The Bowery Mural Wall is ready to turn over, but not without someone tagging the white wall first. (Bowery Boogie)

Hervey Weinstein, a real-world Cloverfield-style monster, tentatively reached a $44 million settlement to resolve the lawsuits against him. (NY Times)

The MTA’s Inspector General will be the sacrificial goat when it comes to the overtime scandal. Governor Cuomo is set to replace 12-year IG Barry Kluger with the governor’s Special Council for Public Integrity Carolyn Pokorny. Gothamist)

Who can you blame for your allergies? Men! Well, kinda. (Atlas Obscura)

Food and drink recommendations on Memorial Day from Grub Street. (Should be obvious this is from Grub Street)

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