The Briefly for February 23-25, 2021 – The “Movie Theaters Reopen on March 5” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The biggest idiot in New York, a deathbed confession links the NYPD to Malcolm X’s assassination, the best doughnuts and more

Today – Low: 34˚ High: 40˚
Drizzle in the morning and afternoon.

• Only an idiot would steal a bunch of merchandise from a Chanel store and then brag online about having enough merchandise to open a small boutique. Meet Eric Spencer, that alleged idiot, who was arrested in Florida for allegedly sticking up a SoHo Chanel store in broad daylight earlier this month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• Thanks to a deathbed confession, there is new evidence that the NYPD and FBI conspired in the assassination of Malcolm X. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera may not return in 2021. The Met’s General Manager Peter Gelb is trying to cut wages 30% long term across the opera’s workforce and the stage employee union is standing up to Gelb with the campaign “Without People the Opera is Nothing.” (Bobby Panza for I Love the Upper West Side)

New York City movie theaters can reopen on March 5 at 25% capacity and PCR tests will not be required to enter. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

• The Times questions if Governor Cuomo’s bullying style can still work in politics, detailing years of intimidation, insults, and threats. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

• As reported last week, Pearl River Mart is re-opening this spring in a new location in Soho. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

• Ask an epidemiologist: Dr. Jessica Justman on how to stay safe on the subway. The clean surfaces don’t matter nearly as much as wearing a mask and keeping your distance. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

MTA transit crews will now give out a second mask to anyone who asks for it. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• Interview: What it’s like to start a nursing career during the Covid-19 crisis. (Alexa Shahrestani for Bedford + Bowery)

• While not NYC specific, this data visualization of the 500,000 American deaths due to the Coronavirus is absolutely staggering and worth of your time to understand its impact. (Sam Hart for Reuters)

• Advocates for charter schools hope more can reopen soon, after a judge ruled the city must include them in the program that provides free weekly tests at traditional public schools. The city is appealing the ruling, arguing the city’s obligation to provide free, random sample testing beyond Department of Education schools. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The city now has a “recovery czar,” whatever that means. Recovery from the pandemic seems like it should be the top focus of the mayor, but since we haven’t fully recovered yet from Hurricane Sandy, we can hardly expect the mayor to treat this like it’s his job either. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

New FEMA-managed vaccination sites will open on Wednesday at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn and York College in Queens with appointments available for people who are currently eligible and live in nearby zip codes. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

• Despite what the mayor has publicly said, some second doses of the Covid-19 vaccine were delayed by the weather. NYC Health + Hospitals claim they will be resupplied by mid-week. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Madison Square Garden announced its first concert in 2021. Colombian reggaeton artist Maluma is scheduled to perform on October 1. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Peoples Improv Theater is vacating its main location on East 24th Street. The PIT List and Pioneers bar on 29th St will remain for now. (Anne Victoria Clark for Vulture)

The NYCHA keeps poisoning kids with lead with apartments they declare are “lead-free.” It is shameful that the city has poisoned over 1,000 children in the last decade. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

• This is a great moment to ask the question “What is the NYCHA?” and other questions about public housing. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

• The City Council seems ready to take a serious look at reducing certain helicopter traffic around the city to the degree that they can. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

• Podcast: Guiddalia Emilien discusses her run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

Who is running for Staten Island borough president? Surprise! They’re both Republicans. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• If you’re horny for watching Trump lose, I’ve got some great news for you. The Supreme Court denied the unemployed Florida man’s attempts to block Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance from obtaining eight years of his personal tax records. A grand jury will see his tax records “almost immediately.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• The city is severing its contracts with the Trump Organization to operate the Wollman Rink and Lasker Rink in Central Park ahead of April. The rinks will stay open through the end of the season despite the city first announcing they would close early. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

• Photos: Check out these massive, climbable sculptures are headed to MoMA PS1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

• Photos: The Lake in Central Park is frozen solid! (Michelle Young with photography by Ryan Lahiff for Untapped New York)

10 black baseball sites in New York City. (Dave Kaplan for Untapped New York)

The best doughnut shops in the city. (Swathi Reddy for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 30, 2020 – The “There’s A Great Hot Dog Stand Nearby” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A four-way city schools standoff, what to expect as museums open across the city, where to eat after 11pm, trash in parks, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚
Clear throughout the day.

Wondering what the hell was going on with those fireworks over the Hudson on Thursday night right around 11 pm ? Those were a part of MTV’s Video Music Awards. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

With the first of the month right around the corner, here’s what you should know about rent concessions. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Headlines about New York having the lowest infection rates in six months area great, but they are no reason to relax about following the guidelines. These headlines are literally the reason to stay strict. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor’s plan to reopen the schools is a gamble, and he’s gambling with the health of students, teachers, and staff. With the numbers being as low as they are at the moment, it may look safe, but it’s still a gamble that doesn’t yet have the complete support of the teachers’ union. As we get closer and closer to September 10, we face a showdown between the United Federation of Teachers, who may still call for a strike over safety concerns, the mayor’s office, the City Council, which plans to call for a delay, and Governor Cuomo, who could still step in and overrule the mayor’s decision. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When colleges in the state have 100 cases in two weeks or the total cases equal 5% of the on-campus population, the entire school will go into remote learning for two weeks. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Museum of Natural History plans on opening next month, but those plans could be derailed by a dispute with its union over privacy concerns. The museum wants its employees to use an app to track Covid-19 symptoms using an app whose data is not protected by HIPPA. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

MoMA PS1 will reopen on September 17. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

A guide to MoMA and the Met. (NY Times)

Photos: A first look at the Met’s new Roof Garden Commission Lattice Detour by Héctor Zamora. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

What to expect when heading back to a museum for the first time since March. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Yeah, the Met is opening, but more importantly, the Hot Dog King is back. These kinds of stories seem inconsequential, people who truly love New York have little bits of knowledge that have been obliterated by the pandemic. These kinds of stories are the ones that defy the narrative that the city is, ahem, “dead.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

“Have you not walked the streets? Have you not seen the people here? Born here, bred here, living and breathing here. They are scrappy, scared, hungry, and tired, but more importantly, they’re pissed. If anything the rebel cry of thousands, millions, fighting to live is what should terrify anyone that dare declare us dead.”
– Ariama C. Long, Who The Fuck Are You To Tell Me My City’s Dead for Kings County Politics

The argument that laughs in the face of the modern “Why I left New York” essay. (Talmon Joseph Smith for The Atlantic)

The House of Yes’ liquor license was suspended. The center of the suspension seems to be centered around the House of Yes not offering food directly, but relying on a “sister” restaurant and seemingly pleading ignorance of how the rules worked in addition to playing loud music. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Check out the designs for the Brooklyn park dedicated to LGBTQ advocate Marsha P. Johnson. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

At the RNC, President Trump made some assertions about crime in New York City. Here are the facts. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Speaking of the RNC, multiple New Yorkers who are NYCHA residents were featured in a video during the convention without their knowledge. They have come forward to let everyone know they are not Trump supporters and were tricked into appearing the in the video. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

MSG will be used as a polling site in November’s election thanks to the deal the NBA players’ union made with the league’s owners. There hasn’t been any word about the Barclays Center yet. (Faraz Toor for NY1)

In a move to attempt to stave off clerical problems in a similar fashion to the ones that were ever-present in the June primaries, Governor Cuomo signed and tweaked legislation that will notify voters of issues with their ballots that can be fixed within seven days of being notified. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD officer Henry Vidal was arrested in March for beating his partner inside her Harlem apartment. He was suspended without pay and ordered to stay away from the woman. On Friday he violated that order and reportedly pulled a gun on her and threatened to kill her inside her sister’s home. He was arrested and is still suspended without pay. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s new chokehold ban is a month old and already the City Council is bowing to the NYPD and is considering amending it. The NYPD is banned from sitting, kneeling, or standing on someone’s chest or back that compresses the diaphragm. The NYPD wants to add the word “recklessly” to the wording, which is a loophole big enough to drive an NYPD SUV straight through. (NY1)

This is the NYPD, which has no problem recklessly parking and blocking bus stops. (Jose Martinez for The City)

This is the same NYPD that has been occupying streets adjacent to precincts since June and has recently gone as far as setting up “checkpoints” on their needlessly occupied streets. (Nick Garber for Patch)

It’s hard to imagine our idiot mayor enforcing anything when his motorcade blocked a waterfront bike lane so he could make an announcement about ferries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Trash complaints are up 120% in the city’s parks. The city’s solution is an advertising campaign urging people to throw out their trash. While I can appreciate the effort, actually maintaining the parks may go further than asking people politely, but with an $84 million budget cut, ads in LinkNYC kiosks might be as good as we can get. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you want to see President Trump wearing a mask (a facemask, not a leather gimp mask you sickos), the only place you’ll be able to see it is in Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Punjabi Deli on Houston is open for the first time in four months. The food is legendary, especially for vegans and vegetarians. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The city added six more streets for outdoor dining in Boerum Hill, Garment District, Flatiron, Harlem, and Astoria. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

‘Tis the season for billionaires to form shady coalitions and astroturfed “advocacy” to fight the idea that the rich should be taxed, if not eaten whole. It almost worked, but their partners are all withdrawing after being outed as possibly bankrolled by a billionaire Republican. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Thinking about starting a food business? How about shelling out for this space shuttle food truck? It was formerly a DC-3 airliner and has a full-service, commercial kitchen, restroom, and cockpit. You’ll have to sell a lot of astronaut ice cream to afford the $149,000 price point. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats to Mayor de Blasio, who is overseeing a city that is giving thousands of parking tickets to its frontline nurses, despite explicitly giving them parking placards to avoid getting tickets. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

At the beginning of the year, it seemed like we had three front-runners for 2021’s mayoral race with Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Three men and two of them are white. The Times asks do New York City voters want another white mayor? (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to eat outside after 11pm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 10, 2020 – The “Governor Cuomo’s Art is a Nightmare” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The hottest lunch spots, MoMA and BAM get rival record store installations, the new hot bird, the BQX will not die, free Whoppers for the Bronx, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 48˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 66˚

The MTA sent a cease and desist to an artist creating original subway maps on Etsy. His map is still available directly at his website. (Aaron Gordon for Vice)

The trains removed from the MTA’s subway fleet were removed over concerns that the doors would open while the trains were in motion. According to Bombadier, the manufacturer, “the doors had not been properly calibrated by a supplier.” This is all very reassuring. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The governor designed a poster and it’s a freakin’ nightmare. Cuomo himself supposedly had input on this monstrosity, and thank god he went into politics instead of art. Honestly it’s too unbelievable. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

A look at five city-focused proposals from Governor Cuomo’s State of the State address. (Bernadette de Vito for Kings County Politics)

>BAM’s Rudin Family Gallery is being , an installation that explores the significance of record shops and recording studios. The installation will include a working recording studio and record shop. Never Records opens at BAM on January 15. (Bill Pearing for Brooklyn Vegan)

Not to be outdone, MoMA is opening The Record Shop, in partnership with Earwax Records through March 1. There will be fine art prints, books, record players, and records that are a part of MoMA’s permanent collection for sale. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A look at William Pope.L’s “member: Pope.L, 1978-2001” exhibit at MoMA. Pope.l is likely best known for his “crawls,” like “The Great White Way: 22 Miles, 9 Years, 1 Street” where he wore a Superman costume and crawled up Broadway. (Martha Schwendener for NY Times)

Adelina’s in Greenpoint is making some major changes for the new year. Last year the restaurant converted to all vegetarian and vegan and this year they’re jettisoning their pizza fritter for pinsa Romana. (Greenpointers)

The TWA Hotel is trying their hardest to continue to make headlines. A swimming pool on the roof, an ice skating rink, a bar in an airplane, and now a “retro Alpine hideaway.” No doubt you’ll find your jet setting friend posting to Instagram from the new roof installation. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Gowanus is full of unexpected activities. Shuffleboard, ax throwing, street curling, rock climbing, and don’t forget 3D archery. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Fran Drescher is developing “The Nanny” for Broadway. No word on when Ms. Fine will make her Broadway debut. (NY1)

“We are evaluating all legal options against Bombardier, including the best way to recover costs incurred as a result of this matter.” -Andy Byford (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The No Pants Subway Ride is this Sunday. (Kate Hooker for Brooklyn Based)

Move over Mandarin Duck, the hottest bird in the city is now the Painted Bunting in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Birds! (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to have a vegetarian birthday dinner. (The Infatuation)

For those of us who don’t understand the appeal of Wegmans, a personal essay about warmth, enjoyment and Wegmans. (Nancy Davidoff Kelton for West View News)

Who would have guessed that CBS NY would win “worst headline of the week” over anything at the NY Post? This week CBS went with a long-debunked theory about how HIV is transmitted to stoke fear about the new bail reforms. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The BQX just will not die. The $2 billion project that would link Red Hook to Astoria has a new website which gives some information about public hearings and the timing of the project. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the MTA proposed removing bus service from a portion of Roosevelt Ave in Queens, City Council Member Costa Constantinides has proposed a reform to the MTA’s board, allowing for each borough to have its own representative appointed by the borough president instead of the four members appointed by the mayor. (Kristen Torres for Jackson Heights Post)

Mayor De Blasio put a panel together to help decide what should be done with the necessary BQE construction along the Brooklyn Promenade. Their recommendation? Create another panel. No solution, some recommendations to reduce traffic, but ultimately a draft release of the report says that this is a project that needs federal, state, and local input. Perhaps this will be discussed until the BQE literally crumbles. (Dana Rubensten for Politico)

FREE Williamsburg is ending its run this year, the 22nd year of its existence. They’ll be celebrating the end at Saint Vitus at the end of the month. (Robert Lanham for FREE Williamsburg)

Burger King is trying to make living near the Joker stairs in the Bronx a bit less painful with a promotion for a free Whopper if you live in the Bronx through Uber Eats. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Neir’s Tavern in Woodhaven has been open since 1829 (or 1855 depend on who you listen to). This Sunday is its last day, as the bar is closing for good after a battle with its landlord over rent, so head out to Woodhaven this weekend to raise a glass to one of the city’s oldest watering holes. (Kevin Walsh at Forgotten New York)

Is a surprise for no one, WeWork lease-signing is at a five year low. (Jack Sidders for Bloomberg)

Nothing is as Murray Hill as this White Claw Hard Seltzer display where a magazine rack used to be. (@heybonanos)

A former Brooklyn cop was sentenced Wednesday to one day in jail and four years of probation nearly a year after he claimed a suspect almost ran him and his partner over with a car—until a video surfaced months later that showed he lied. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Two Wheels, Soho Diner, the Deco, the Awkward Scone, Yafa Cafe join Eater’s list of the 14 hottest lunch spots in NYC. (Eater)