The Briefly for October 4-5 2020 – The “Is It Finally Time To Find A New Apartment?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The mayor is robbing the city to pay for his ferries, delivering comforting words with your pizza, Hillary Clinton talks art, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Clear throughout the day.

Have you been seeing comedy shows popping up in unconventional places? Well, it’s because comedy is technically illegal anywhere food and drinks are sold. (Sasha von Olderhausen)

The $100 million cut to the Sanitation department seems to have hit the Bronx the hardest. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Is this a good time to find a new apartment? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Yeah, rents might be seeing a temporary drop, but it seems like New York City is still on its way to having the highest rent in the country. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Human Rights Watch report called the NYPD’s actions against protesters on June 4 in Mott Haven “intentional, planned, and unjustified.” The mayor continues to defend the NYPD’s actions, but finally admitted the NYPD’s targeting and assault of legal observers was wrong. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayorally controlled city Economic Development Corporation diverted tens of millions of dollars in rent receipts from publicly owned Times Square real estate holdings to help operate the costly NYC Ferry system. In the middle of a pandemic and budget crisis, maybe it’s not the best time to steal from the city to pay for Mayor de Blasio’s pet projects. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The MTA honored Medgar Evers by renaming the Franklin Ave and President St stations after the civil rights icon and the college that bears his name. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s been enough happening this week before Rock Moranis was randomly punched in the head by a random attacker on Friday morning. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

If you need some comforting words, try ordering from Vinnie’s. In addition to your pizza you can get comforting words for $1. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

The house where Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny was written in is in Greenwich Village. On March 5, 1967, it was put on a flatbed truck on the Upper East Side and moved to where it sits today. (Sydney Rose for Atlas Obscura)

The MTA is getting some work done ahead of schedule at the Sutphin Blvd.-Archer Ave E train station, taking advantage of the moment’s low ridership. The work will conclude by November 2. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

“The local government’s responsibility is to enforce the law.” – Governor Cuomo is making more threats towards the city, this time accompanied by a $10,000 daily fine for lack of enforcement. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Add the nearly 70-year-old Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side to the list of restaurants that have closed in the pandemic. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Things are awful. It’s okay to talk about art sometimes. Here’s an interview with Hillary Clinton about her love of Broadway. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A guide to better understanding the city’s Covid-19 data. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Something strange is happening in Boro Park when it comes to Covid-19. Anonymous Yiddish robocalls are targeting Boro Park and Williamsburg urging people against getting tested “as this drives up the numbers,” in the Bobov Hasidic community, leaders are encouraging anyone who already had the virus to get tested to also drive the numbers down, and there are reports that some providers are withholding reporting test results. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alright, it’s currently flu season and it’s been Covid-19 season since February. Here’s how to identify different symptoms of either. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

The biryani delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

This story is about how the governor sent Trump a “recovery basket” of buffalo wings, bagels, and cheesecake, but also did you know that Cuomo declared the official state snack to be Greek yogurt in 2014? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Holy shit, Cellino & Barnes’ Steve Barnes died in a plane crash. (Juliana Kim for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s Third Avenue claimed another life as a bicyclist was hit and killed by a motorcyclist on Saturday morning. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Staten Island to NYC regarding budget woes: “Don’t tread on me.” (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

“The time to address this challenge is now – before the area’s growth and changes cause even more displacement. Industry City will grow and change even without their proposed rezoning. The campus will continue to attract more jobs and more residents. We cannot pretend these changes aren’t occurring. Sunset Park must vigorously preserve the affordable units it has, better protect tenants and begin to support development without displacement that creates truly and permanently affordable housing.”
-Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee & Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Industry City is dead, but Sunset Park still needs help for amNewYork Metro

NYC has a corn maze. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Zoo’s holiday light show is returning this November for something to do outdoors while we’re still locked indoors. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything is canceled, so here are 8 places to personally celebrate Oktoberfest. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Sarah for today’s featured photo from the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano.

The Briefly for September 27-28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining Returns, Outdoor Dining Becomes Permanent” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 600k kids return to school this week, the mayor announces future announcements, the best new burgers in the city

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Video: In case you were wondering, the NYPD’s tactics have not changed in the face of months straight of protests throughout the city. This was the scene last night in the West Village as the NYPD swarmed protesters on 6th St after the “Celebration of Art Of Protest” in Washington Square Park (FreedomNewsTV)

The NYPD ended its training program for officers to de-escalate encounters with people in a mental health crisis. The future of the program is in limbo. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Indoor dining returns this Wednesday in NYC. Here’s how restaurants are preparing. Keep in mind, not every restaurant will be taking part. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Outdoor dining is now permanent. Here’s everything to know about the city’s permanent outdoor dining plan. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coronavirus anxiety and depression have hit NYC, as a new study says 44% of New Yorkers are feeling anxiety about the virus and 36% felt depressed since the start of our PAUSE. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How will the city’s souvenir shops survive the pandemic without tourists? Maybe they won’t. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Good news for you if you’re someone who has been collecting your compost since the city’s collections stopped in March. Compost drop-off locations return to six Greenmarkets. (Tequila Minsky for The Villager)

The American Museum of Natural History fired Mark E. Siddall after the museum found that he had sexually harassed and bullied a graduate student who was doing research under his supervision. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Tourist helicopters are back to annoy city dwellers and, in a surprising twist, they’re coming from Jersey. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Next year’s city-wide elections will be ranked-choice. I’ve linked to this explainer video multiple times already, so when city officials and candidates argue that we’re not ready for a new voting system, you can tell them to go to hell. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Home sales are surging on Brooklyn. Tell that to the next person who bemoans how many people are leaving the city for the suburbs. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Dianne Smith has a new installation titled “Styling: Black Expression, Rebellion and Joy Through Fashion” that pays tribute to Black women who shape and redefine what it means to be stylish. The location? Nordstrom at Columbus Circle. This is the first full-scale art exhibition at the location. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The MTA is set to run out of money before 2021 and will likely be forced to borrow money to survive. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

When someone vandalized the A train tracks last week, Rikien Wilder was there to clear some of the items thrown on the tracks and tackle the vandal as they tried to get away. The MTA showed their appreciation for Wilder’s heroics with a free year of subway rides. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Here’s someone trying to find the silver lining in the clouds of Century 21’s closing in Bay Ridge. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a renters market, the Times gives some advice about how to negotiate with your landlord. (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

On August 23, 1974, John Lennon claims he saw a UFO outside Midtown East apartment. (Dave Lifton for Ultimate Classic Rock)

The apartment that John Lennon was living in, and saw the UFO from, is now for sale for $5.5 million. It’s a 4,000 triplex and it’s also where the iconic John Lennon “New York City” photo was taken. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe you’ll see your own UFOs after purchasing the apartment because UFO sightings are up in New York. At 184 sightings, we’ve already exceeded the 151 sightings total for 2019. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The asshole of the week is Heshy Tischler, who crashed a press conference about the uptick in Covid-19 cases in the Ocean Parkway Cluster without a mask and denying the existence of the virus, causing the press conference to be cut short. (Aidan Graham and Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

“There’s rampant COVID denialism and misinformation abound in the community. People are not getting tested and are refusing care even when sick. This is deeply distressing.” Three men from Orthodox communities died from Covid-19 last week at Maimonides Hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio held a press conference announcing that he will hold future press conferences about the city’s “rebirth.” I’d argue the city’s rebirth starts on election day 2021 when we pick a new mayor. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor bowed to pressure from Upper West Siders to remove 300 homeless men from a temporary shelter. Then he took that decision back. Then he took that decision back and removing the 300 homeless New Yorkers from their temporary shelter and move them to another shelter in the Financial District in a move being called “the pinnacle of cowardliness.” Most politicians reveal their true selves once they are no longer up for re-election. I guess the mayor is showing us all who he really is. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The mayor’s pledge to close Rikers Island is falling apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to a federal judge’s ruling, you have until October 31 to fill out your census information. The Trump administration had tried to shorten the deadline to September 30 and the city is woefully behind on people filling it out. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

John Burns, a longtime friend of the mayor and first deputy commissioner at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, resigned under fire after an investigation found he mistreated a female employee and created a hostile workplace. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Photos: A first look at Eataly’s honey-themed rooftop restaurant. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

It’s a fantastical idea: The Mandragore would use half of Roosevelt Island to build the country’s tallest building and the world’s tallest “carbon sink” that would actually reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the city and generate energy with wind turbines and solar panels. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Miles Morales: Spider-Man, coming for the PlayStation 4 and 5, uses Harlem as its setting, a rare location for a digital depiction of New York City. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

The six best new burgers in the city. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Photos: Check out the new bike-based cargo delivery vehicles you’ll be seeing around the city soon. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What’s your subway station number? An interactive subway map that gives you a ranking as a New Yorker based on every subway station you’ve ever been to. (My score was 152, giving me the title of “NYC Lifer”) (The Cleverest)

10 great places to see on a Brooklyn Greenway bike ride. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: Inside the secret train track hidden in the depths of Grand Central Terminal. (Emily Nonko for 6sqft)

Restoration work on the Empire State Building’s Art Deco spire is complete, giving the building’s “hat” its original silhouette. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The mayor announced 9,000 furloughs of managers and city employees not under union contracts. The unlucky 9,000 will be laid off for five cays between October and March. The mayor’s looking to save a billion dollars to prevent 22,000 layoffs and these furloughs will save $21 million. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Among these 9,000? The Department of Education announced furloughs for superintendents and other non-union management will be furloughed. Perfect timing as schools are reopening. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

70 staff members as IS 51 in Staten Island are in quarantine after a teacher tested positive for Covid-19. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

In a reversal of education department policy, city teachers will now be allowed to work remotely if they are teaching students who are learning from home, according to a new agreement reached Friday between the city and the teachers union. Seems weird they’d be forced to come to a school building to teach remote students, right? (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Here’s what you need to know about K-8 students returning to schools this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The secret patios of NYC, where you can eat and drink away from the street. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from The Edge!

The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)