The Briefly for July 16, 2019 – The “No One Knows What Caused the Blackout” Edition

ConEd is not untouchable, the Queens DA race is giving Bush v Gore vibes, the best restaurants in the East Village, the ice cream wars of Dumbo have begun, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Deep below the Flatiron Building, there’s an unused coal-fueled power plant that pre-dates the building’s steam systems. You probably will never get a personal tour of it, so experiencing it through this photo gallery is the closest you’ll get. (Untapped Cities)

The pizza wars of Dumbo continue on, but the ice cream war between Ample Hills and the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory are only just beginning. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Want to prepare for the next (inevitable) blackout? Here’s a list of six things you can do to get yourself ready. (Curbed)

Why are so many of the escalators in the new Q train subway stations broken so often? Don’t ask the MTA, because they can’t figure it out. (amNY)

Put ConEd down in the same category as the MTA, because they can’t seem to get their story straight about what caused this blackout. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo appears to be sick of ConEd’s shit between this outage, the fire in Astoria that lit the sky, and transformer fires in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, and he’s open to replacing them. (Gothamist)

How has ConEd responded to this massive outage? By making a public statement that the heat this week could cause more outages. Lovely. (Huff Post)

The cost of the blackout was $3.5 on Broadway alone, with 26 of 30 possible performances being canceled. Saturday in July is Broadway’s most popular night in the most popular month. (NY Times)

A brief history of blackouts in New York City. (amNY)

The NYPD won’t share details about an off-duty Queens cop who was arrested on charges of false imprisonment and assault, calling it a “confidential investigation” while flagrantly showing the NYPD’s “fundamental and pervasive lack of transparency,” as cited in a report earlier this year. (Gothamist)

From romantic to the club to sporty to outdoors: where to go for date night in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

Staten Island politicians are urging the governor to start a “microtransit” pilot program to expand transit options throughout the city’s largest borough. Microtransit refers to buses and not alternative modes of transportation, as Staten Island remains a borough without any bike lanes. (Curbed)

With Jeff Bezos buying a Manhattan apartment, protestors of Amazon have a new target to make their voices heard. (Patch)

It seemed the public call for volunteers worked, the Giglio Lift went off without a hitch last weekend, which is the largest of the lifts during Williamsburg’s Giglio Feast. The feast continues through the weekend with more lifts on Wednesday and Sunday nights. (Gothamist)

There is a fight for survival happening all around us, as invasive species are threatening the city’s flora. The problem is only a biodiversity one, but fighting invasive bugs and plants can be costly. The treatment and removal of ash trees due to a beetle infestation will cost the city nearly $10 million over three years. (amNY)

What’s the latest on the Mandarin Duck? He seems to have left the city a few months ago and we should expect him back after the summer. Ducks molt in the summer and while they’re flightless they look for safer and more private bodies of water. (Gothamist)

Residents of the financial district are trying to get the city to pump the brakes before construction begins on the last building in the World Trade Center in an attempt to keep the project selection process fair and to ensure the neighborhood benefits from another massive construction project. (amNY)

Photos from the Queens DA primary recount is giving off major Bush v Gore vibes. (NY Times)

The next expansions of CitiBike’s coverage will be painfully slow. The current roll-out will take until 2023– the service’s decade anniversary– to complete. (Streetsblog)

The statue outside of the Museum of Natural History of Teddy Roosevelt atop a horse, flanked by an African-American and a Native American was one of the monuments the city was reconsidered in 2017. The statue has attracted negative attention for Roosevelt’s racist views and statements about Native Americans and Africans and has been the target of protest multiple times since installation in 1940. The museum is leaning into controversy by highlighting the criticism of the statue and of the museum’s history to complicate and contextualize without glorification. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in the East Village. (The infatuation)

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The Briefly for July 3, 2019 – The “Pick A Side: Iced Coffee vs Cold Brew” Edition

Everything you need for July 4, the drink of the summer, new school gender inclusion guidelines, lying roaches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the deal with the subways and buses on July 4. (6sqft)

Expect massive crowds and tight security if you’re checking out the fireworks over the east river. (Patch)

Safety tips for pet owners on July 4. (amNY)

Each year’s Fourth of July fireworks display in the city starts in the California desert, in 11 underground bunkers in high-security facilities. (NY Times)

What’s open and what’s closed on July 4. (Patch)

The New York Times is never why when it comes to controversy, and they jumped in head-first with this one. Is cold brew better than iced coffee? (NY Times)

Checking in with Tom’s Restaurant on the Upper West Side 30 years after Seinfeld‘s pilot aired. (Gothamist)

The top 10 secrets of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

Despite every last inch of Manhattan having been developed, there is still wildlife. With the year half over, coyote sightings in Central Park are at quadruple the level they were for all of 2018. If you encounter one, leave it alone and report it. (I Love the Upper West Side)

While conservatives around the country are mounting challenges to Roe v Wade, New York City has become more accommodating to those seeking an abortion. Charities helping women afford abortions are seeing a higher percentage of those women come from outside the city. The city even set aside a quarter of a million dollars in support for the New York Abortion Access Fund to assist people from outside the city be able to afford an abortion. (Gothamist)

The okapi diorama at the Museum of Natural History is considered to be one of the world’s most impressive taxidermy dioramas. Here’s the story behind the diorama and even the one riddle/practical joke that can be found if you look close enough. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza issued new gender inclusion guidelines to better support the city’s 1.1 million students. The guide touches on sports, name and gender changes, dress codes, and more. While they are still only guidelines, they are being praised by advocacy groups as a good start. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Don’t be alarmed, but we’ve hit “the cockroaches are flying” time of year. (Gothamist)

Right now the city’s homeless shelters turn away people with pets, which becomes a real problem for the 10-25% of people experiencing homelessness who have pets. More than 98% of animals surrendered to the city’s Animal Care Centers in the last six months are due to their owners’ homelessness. Two bills making their way towards the city council could change that. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s restaurants have begun to embrace the latest food trend: chickpeas. (amNY)

Sometimes it’s better not to ask. Like, “What is that black, smelly liquid pouring out of the elevator at Grand Central?” Maybe that’s information we should never know. “Why was it gushing out and why did it smell like sewage?” These are more questions that should not be asked because you probably don’t want to know the answer. (Gothamist)

On any given day you can find multiple photos of NYPD vehicles using the city’s bike lanes like personal parking garages, which makes the mayor’s declaration that the NYPD is going to start taking drivers in the city’s bike lanes laughable. (Streetsblog)

Apologies to our mayor, who had his time in Iowa interrupted to discuss the three bicyclist deaths in the city in the last week. A “crisis,” but not enough of a crisis to deal with it within the confines of the city that he’s supposed to be in charge of. The mayor was short on details, aside from increased NYPD enforcement of pre-existing laws. (Gothamist)

The crackdown is not permanent, but a three-week targeted enforcement. (Streetsblog)

Fact-checking the president’s claims that New York’s taxes are driving people away. (NY Times)

Our president is a serial liar, so no one should be surprised that despite his claims that he’s never had an alcoholic drink that he regularly drank in New York City, according to a new book by Allen Salkin. (Vice)

The first section of a state park honoring the first African-American woman elected to Congress, Shirley Chisholm, is open in Brooklyn. (Curbed)

The city is speckled with the history of the revolutionary war if you know where to look. (amNY)

Remember the city’s styrofoam ban? It’s in effect and the first fines have been issued. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s Belvedere Castle is open after a 15-month renovation. (Time Out)

The drink of the summer: The Gin and Tonic Plus (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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