The Briefly for January 17-18, 2021 – The “Micheal Scott in Times Square at Sbarro” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: MLK day in NYC, how to get vaccinated in NYC, meet the 38 mayoral candidates, Cuomo’s infrastructure projects, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 43˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

What’s open and closed on Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 18. (Matt Troutman for PAtch)

A list of NYC’s tributes to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

BAM is presenting The 35th Annual Brooklyn Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., which is free and virtual on Monday at 11 am. (BAM)

How to get the Coronavirus vaccine in NYC. (Ron Lieber)

Map: How New York state is doing with its vaccine rollout. (Hint: New York City has the lowest percentage of first doses administered. (Jen Chung and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

On Thursday afternoon a message was going online around that there would be vaccines administered on a first-come, first-served basis at the Brooklyn Army Terminal. This was called a hoax by some but there was truth to the message. Very quickly, the vaccination site was overwhelmed with people. Vaccination sites have the ability to administer “extra” vaccines at the end of the day if they are going to expire but the city isn’t looking for a Black Friday scenario every day at every vaccination site. I’d expect this policy to change as a result of these lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It seems impossible that there are “extra” doses of the vaccine lying around when tens of thousands of vaccination appointments are being canceled in New York due to the limited supply of the vaccine provided by the federal government. The state’s supply was cut from 300,000 per week to 250,000 per week with 100,000 being allocated to the city. (Joseph Goldstein and Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

There are over 30 people running for mayor in 2021. Here’s a quick rundown of them all. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Of the 38 candidates, Eric Adams and Scott Stringer have received the most cash support. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

It is decided that Andrew Yang will be this mayoral cycle’s punching bag. He’s not helping himself when the first question asked of him is “don’t you live in the Hudson Valley?” and the second question is now “don’t you know what a bodega is?” While it’s still early in his campaign, he’s making a few unforced communication errors that are not endearing him to the city as “one of our own.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

Real Estate Lust: This penthouse has so much outdoor space the first photo doesn’t even look real. $12.5 million, 3,500 square feet of outdoor space, and a dining room that can seat 30. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Satire: “My work seeks to interrogate the parameters by which we define and demarcate physical space, exploring the fertile liminal zone between the falsely binary notions of “indoors” and “outdoors” we too often take for granted.” –I Am The Designer Of This Restaurant’s Outdoor Seating Space, And This Is My Artist’s Statement (Simon Henriques for McSweeney’s)

Takeout in Greenpoint for under $10. (Katie White for Greenpointers)

On Tuesday night, the Empire State Building will beat like a heart, bathed in red light, as a part of Joe Biden’s Covid-19 memorial from 5:30 pm to 2 am. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

160 secrets about New York City, enough to impress some of your friends but bore the rest. For instance: Einstein’s eyeballs are stored in a safety deposit box in the city. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A look at ranked-choice voting ahead of the first election to use it in NYC, the February 2 City Council District 24 election. (Pia Koh for Queens County Politics)

Governor Cuomo is floating the idea of using rapid Covid testing to determine entry into live events. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Four restaurants that recently started selling groceries. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A running list of restaurants that are temporarily closing this winter. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Governor Cuomo unveiled a $306 billion infrastructure plan that would replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal with a new state-of-the-art facility, reconstruct Penn Station and add at least eight new tracks along with 14 new buildings with retail space and up to 1,400 affordable apartments, a new waterfront park at Pier 76, and a $1.5 billion expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Center. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Atlas Obscura usually highlights mysteries or fascinations. There is no fascinating mystery quite like the Gowanus Canal. (Jessica Leigh Hester for Atlas Obscura)

The Times highlights the life and tireless work of Michael Evans, the project manager of the Moynihan Hall transformation. Evans took his own life seemingly due to the stress of the project only ten months before its completion. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The City jumps into NY AG Letitia James’s lawsuit against the city and NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan’s role as the architect of the aggressive and violent response to the city’s protests over the summer and his history of over-policing peaceful protests, directing cops to make unlawful arrests and allowing the use of excessive force going back 16 years. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The visuals of the MTA bus that fell off an overpass are amazing, especially considering no one died and only eight were injured. The bus was going 17-26 mph when it should have been going 3-4 mph. (Jen Chung and Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

More photos from the MTA of the bus incident and the media briefing. (Photographer Marc A. Hermann for MTA on Flickr)

For a laugh, the best pizza places in New Jersey. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Filming locations for Martin Scorsese & Fran Lebowitz’s “Pretend It’s a City.” I’m extremely jealous they got to walk in the Queens Museum’s Panorama of the City of New York. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Deanne Criswell, city’s Emergency Management Commissioner, is Joe Biden’s pick for the next head of FEMA. (NY1)

Kyrie Irving, Brooklyn Nets point guard and complete asshole, was fined $50,000 for breaking the NBA’s Covid-19 protocols. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The argument for Mets owner Steven Cohen to bring Coney Island’s original hot dog, Feltman’s, to Citi Field. (The Coney Island Blog)

The New York City Campaign Finance Board fined current City Councilmember Mathieu Eugene $10,717 for nine violations of campaign finance law, including failure to report transactions and making impermissible post-election expenditures. (Billy Richling for Bklyner)

Here’s wishing Congressmember, Adriano Espaillat, who represents parts of the Bronx and Manhattan, a speedy recovery after testing positive for Covid-19, likely contracting the virus during the attack on the Capitol and sheltering in place with Republicans who refused to wear masks. (Norwood News)

For the spooky set, part four of the GVSHP’s Cemeteries of the East Village. (Sam Moskowitz for GVSHP)

Where to eat when staying warm is a top priority. Restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Today’s featured photo is by Marc A. Hermann, courtesy of the MTA

The Briefly for December 27-28, 2020 – The “Most Wonderful Time of the Year” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Two exciting new birds, reanimating the Village Voice, Andrew Yang files for a mayoral run, a vaccine dashboard, and more

Today – Low: 34˚ High: 37˚
Clear throughout the day.

Interview: Author John Birdsall on how James Beard’s queerness influenced American culture. *Sean Carlson and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

22 celebratory restaurants open on New Year’s Eve. (Lorelei Yang for Eater)

A better idea, takeout. The best NYE takeout specials. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, it’s Mulchfest! Bring your trees for mulching to one of the city’s 33 sites for mulching on Saturdays through January 9. Bring your own bag to bring home your mulch or donate it to the city. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Two more rare birds for the bird lovers! A western tanager was seen in Carl Schurz Park and a greater white-fronted goose was spotted on Randall’s Island. (Nick Garber for Patch)

Someone is digging up and reanimating the bones of The Village Voice, which died in September 2017. Unfortunately that someone is Brian Calle, who most recently ruined the L.A. Weekly after purchasing it. The death of The Village Voice was one of the things that pushed me to start The Briefly. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Farewell to Pizza Beach, which closed its doors for good right before the indoor dining ban took effect earlier this month. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The New York Automatic Voter Registration Act became law on December 22. It will automatically register eligible New Yorkers to vote when they interact with different governmental agencies. (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

Meet Los Deliveristas Unidos, a group of independent (most of the city’s 80,000 deliveristas are independent) restaurant delivery workers who are fighting for better pay and improved worker protections while the city relies on them more than ever. (Valeria Ricciulli for Grub Street)

The governor announced the coronavirus eviction moratorium will stay in place after January 1. Governor Cuomo did not announce how long the moratorium would be extended. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Congrats to @SidetalkNYC for making this list of things Ashley Reese was inexplicably horny for in 2020. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

What’s it like to date right now? Here are the answers from 20 single New Yorkers. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Trump gained voters in NYC? Yup. Trump increased his share of votes in almost all of the city’s assembly districts. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

The city killed off two rezonings on Franklin Ave in Crown Heights. In one case, Judge Reginald Boddie reversed the 2018 rezoning certification for two 16-story developments at 40 Crown Street and 931 Carroll Street and Franklin. Mayor de Blasio spoke up against the proposed 960 Franklin Avenue redevelopment, calling it “grossly out of scale with the neighborhood.” This is the development that the Brooklyn Botanical Garden was also fighting against with its “Fight for Sunlight” campaign. (Ben Verde for Brownstoner)

Tony Robbins might be New York’s biggest asshole. In a new lawsuit, an employee for 18 years alleges Tony Robbins discriminated against her for getting Covid-19. (Azi Paybarah and Michael Levenson for NY Times)

RIP Roger Berlind, producer of over 100 plays and musicals and winner of over 25 Tony Awards. (Katharine Q. Seelye for NY Times)

A 32-year-old woman died after being struck by a Brooklyn-bound 2 subway train on Saturday morning after she was spotted standing between cars on the moving train. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A photo ode to mom-and-pops. (Brian Braiker with photos by Mich Cardin for Brooklyn Magazine)

What to expect for New Year’s Eve. Here’s a hint: Not a normal NYE. (Nick Garber for Patch)

A look at the Republican field for the 2021 mayor’s race. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

On the Democratic side, the Times asks if progressives will rule the mayoral race. (Katie Glueck and Dana Rubinstein for NY Times)

Bike maniac (I mean that in a good way) Dave Colon has invited all the mayoral candidates to go on a bike ride with him. To his credit Carlos Menchaca took him up on the offer. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Andrew Yang filed for a mayoral run. I’ve seen photos of him on a bike, so maybe he’ll take Dave up on his offer. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city launched a new online tool to track Covid-19 vaccinations. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The mayor announced that the NYC sheriff’s department will enforce the city’s two-week quarantine visiting homes or hotel rooms. Does this mean the city hasn’t been enforcing its mandated two-week quarantine period? I’m joking, of course, it means exactly that. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The city was ill-prepared for the first Covid-19 wave, so the mayor set up a Covid-19 “situation room” to handle the city’s schools’ response to further outbreaks. Turns out, the mayor’s situation room is still ill-prepared to deal with rising cases, failing the schools and children the situation room was set up to support. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“And now this thing we should be celebrating — the arrival of this much anticipated vaccine — it’s turning into a rivalry. There is competitiveness and skepticism and mistrust.” Like an episode of the Twilight Zone, the camaraderie that fighting against Covid-19 is falling apart when it comes to who gets the vaccine first. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

Buskers, sitting in the cold, and the 8 things Ginia Bellafante hated about New York until 2020. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

9 restaurants with heated outdoor dining in the Bronx. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A visit to the $100 per person speakeasy Stoned Gourmet Cannabis Pizza somewhere in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Borscht at Verōnika, Pasta A La Presse at The Grill, A Very Good Side Salad at Hunky Dory, and the rest of The Infatuation’s favorite dishes of 2020. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Hillary Reinsberg, Arden Shore, and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 20-21, 2020 – The “Not A Few Bad Apples” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: You can pee indoors again, you can buy the Gem Spa sign, the best meals of the year, the worst time to travel, and more

Today – Low: 34˚ High: 38˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

You can pee in restaurants again. It was less than an hour after Tuesday’s email that the city to reversed guidance that barred outdoor diners from coming inside if they needed to tinkle or drop a deuce. (Benjamin Hart for Grub Street)

22 years after the city said it would move the NYPD tow pound from Pier 76 at 36th St, which sits on state parkland. The state’s budget imposed a $3 million monthly fine on the city that starts in January for not moving the tow pound, which are on top of an additional $12 million in fines that already exist. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Believe it or not, the city’s Department of Investigation found that the problems in the NYPD that caused escalations of violence after the death of George Floyd by its officers was systemic and not caused by a few bad apples, that there was a racial tilt to how people were charged after arrested, and “lacked a clearly defined strategy” to respond to the protests. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The Legal Aid Society is suing the state for the release of information on the spread of COVID-19 in prisons, arguing that the Department of Corrections has failed to identify the facilities where officers have contracted the virus, making it impossible to trace how widespread the virus is within the prison system. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Critically-acclaimed restaurant Hunky Dory in Crown Heights opened the Hunky Depot, a small holiday market in the restaurant’s dining room. There’s room for six at a time so the lines may be as long as their pre-pandemic brunch lines. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The New York City Housing Authority is NYC’s worst landlord for the third year in a row, according to Public Advocate Jumaane Williams’s 100 worst landlords list. Williams lays the blame at the de Blasio administration’s feet for their management of the federal program. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Looking for a last-minute gift for someone who absolutely loves NYC? How about the Gem Spa sign? Gem Spa is auctioning off just about anything they could rip off the walls to those who can afford it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’re looking for some Christmas history in Manhattan, look no further than the seemingly-innocuous flagpole with a star on it in Madison Square Park. The Star of Hope markets the spot of NYC’s first Christmas tree lighting ceremony in 1912. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

13 places to find spectacular holiday decorations in NYC. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Apartment Lust: A $22 million, 7,400 square foot, seemingly endless townhouse on the Upper East Side with a roof deck, wine cellar, multiple smaller decks, and a tub big enough to look like a small pool. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Documentary: “I’ve had women who fondled my dog more than they fondled me” The Dogs of Manhattan from 1998, an often accidentally comedic look at dog walking culture in NYC in the late 90s. (Fat Building/YouTube)

The story of good boy Balto, who has a statue dedicated to him in Central Park, who famously helped bring the diphtheria antitoxin to Nome, Alaska 95 years ago this week seems fitting today. Balto’s statue is just east of the Willowdell Arch. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Subway station secrets. (GoGoSupertoe)

A look at Brooklyn-based photographer Katia Repina’s exhibition “Intimacy in the Time of Corona” at NYU’s Gallatin Galleries. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

Two bills passed by the City Council this week will increase protections for workers at fast-food companies. The first prohibits firing workers without “just cause” and the other requires that layoffs occur by seniority, protecting workers who have worked for companies longer. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Who wants to bet that the auction to destroy Donald Trump’s Atlantic City casino will raise more money than the GoFundMe to buy his childhood house? (Devin Gannon for 6qsft)

The city’s schools are making big changes to deal with the havoc caused by the pandemic, including eliminating academic screens for Middle schools, virtual performing art school auditions, widespread administration of the SHSAT, and eliminating district-based admissions preference. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

There’s been a spike in the number of reported puppy scams lately and this is a reminder that there are plenty of shelters across the city and region. Don’t be the asshole that buys a dog. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

The New York City Parks Department is looking to evict one of the city’s biggest processors of food waste at the end of the year. (Julie Levy for Bedford + Bowery)

The story of how the Blue Light Speak Cheesy went from operating out of an apartment window with paper bags and a pulley system to a full-on operation. (Amy Rowe for Grub Street)

Pernil at La Isla Cuchifritos, Gumbo at FieldTrip, and the rest of Ryan Sutton’s favorite dishes of 2020. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Roberta’s Burgie’s, “burger and fries concept” in East Williamsburg from the folks behind the pizza at Roberta’s is open for take out and delivery only. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Hats off to Ben Weiss, who took a ride on a double-decker tour bus this week. (Ben Weiss for Bedford + Bowery)

If you feel like you absolutely must travel this week, and you should absolutely without question not be doing that, the worst time to be on the road is 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 30. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

31 brunch spots with outdoor heat lamps. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!