The Briefly for September 15-17, 2020 – The “Flesh Eating Bacteria? Who Cares, It’s 2020” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning, the number of Covid-19 positive tests in schools increases, where to eat outside in Park Slope, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.

This isn’t NYC specific, but Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired Police Chief La’Ron Singletary, demonstrating that some mayors know how and when to yield their powers. (Michael Wilson and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Photos: Behind the scenes in Chinatown. (Molly Tavoletti for RESY)

New York City’s highways, reimagined in a subway map. (Zirocket on r/NYC)

We’re inching closer to normal because the F train is closing on nights and weekends for construction. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s not all bad news for the subway, there’s a new escalator in Union Square on the L platform. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Five Connecticut residents were hospitalized with a flesh eating bacteria after going in the water in the Long Island Sound this summer” barely even was a blip on the radar. What a year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Can you help identify this woman, who had a shitfit in a Verizon store when told to wear a mask, throwing around the N-word as she left the store? In a city with so many assholes, she still managed to be the asshole of the week and it’s only Tuesday. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Want to ride the subway or bus without a mask? Get ready for a $50 fine. Next question: Will they fine the NYPD when they ride without masks? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

NYU’s dorm Rubin Hall is on lockdown after 4 students tested positive for Covid-19. (Matthew Fischetti and Trace Miller for Washington Square News)

Photos: The “new” Chelsea Flea opened over the weekend. (Scott LYnch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Libraries in Midwood, Kensington, Mill Basin, Walt Whitman, Washington Irving, and the Annex in Dumbo are open for grab-and-go lending. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council will vote on the Industry City rezoning today. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, whose district contains Industry City, has come out against the rezoning. The City Council usually defers to the local councilmember for these decisions, but multiple members have come out against his stance. (Greg David for The City)

What’s happening to us? New York City’s zip codes don’t even touch the ten most expensive zip codes in the country. (Tim Moran for Patch)

Photos: Baby lynx cubs in the Queens Zoo! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Cloister Cafe was shut down by the SLA in August du to social distancing violations by its patrons but reopened this week thanks to a temporary restraining order against the suspension by a judge. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of how the police unions, full of white Republicans who live in the suburbs, betrayed the city they are supposed to serve by endorsing President Trump. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

The year in (sad) photos. (Tribeca Citizen)

The NYPD takes a full minute longer to respond to shootings and other crisis incidents than they did a year ago. Ambulances are arriving faster than ever before. (Suhali Bhat for The City)

A new vegetarian burger spot, Pop’s Eat-Rite, is opening up a block from Superiority Burger. I, for one, look forward to this burgeoning vegetarian burger district. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to Coyote Ugly, whose original location is officially gone, but it sounds like a new location is coming. (EV Grieve)

Photos: I’ll never not link to photos of goats mowing the grass. (Forrest Michael Bomann for Untapped New York)

The MTA is betting big on the federal government bailing them out to the tune of $12 billion. The rest of us live here on earth. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The Thanksgiving Day Parade isn’t happening. Let’s just go take a nap until it’s 2021. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Want to ask the 2021 mayoral candidates a question? Here’s your chance. (The City)

This isn’t new, but sometimes I think about how Governor Cuomo said he changed his mind about the L train because someone yelled at him on the street. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist in 2019)

Satire: Help! I’m Being Priced out of the Neighborhood I Gentrified. (Graham Isador The Hard Times)

“Teaching has a powerful way of consuming your time that is antipode to the stay-at-home summer of 2020. I’m optimistic that the new school year will sweep away my grief — grief for the hardship and loss my students experienced these past few months, for not being there to offer hugs and high fives, for missing yearbook signing and graduation photo swapping, and for a lackluster farewell. I trust that the new school year will bring with it acceptance, even as I hold on to the wonderful young learners who have filled this classroom with laughter and wonder before.”
Krisy Lawlor, a teacher in the Bronx, My classroom is a time capsule , for Chalkbeat

Last week the number was 19, this week 55 school employees tested positive for Covid-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state threatened to cut 9,000 jobs from NYC school less than one month ago. (Reema Amin for Patch)

Monday, the mayor announced the city will hire 2,000 additional teachers to meet the demands of blended learning. 2,000 is extremely short of the 10,000 teachers the principal’s union called for to make blended learning possible. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

School nurses are reporting that they’ve yet to receive any PPE for the school year. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

42% of NYC students opted for remote learning, up from 26% a few weeks ago. (Lauren Cook for PIX11)

A look at the next Bowery Mural from Mojo, in progress. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Turns out New York’s most famous guitar teacher Dan Smith will still teach you guitar. A story of how Smith is teaching former Governor David Patterson to play guitar. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Expect a marketing campaign to persuade you to vote for Joe Biden under the Working Families Party, as without either 130,000 votes or 2% of the total vote, the Working Families Party will lose ballot access. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Park Slope. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helene for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.