The Briefly for February 5-6, 2021 – The “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Pity the millionaires on Park Ave, mayoral candidates back away from defund the police, searching for the perfect mozzarella stick, & more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 21˚ High: 37˚

• Battery-powered sweatshirts, blanket rentals, navigating a meal in the dark, and the highs and lows of eating outside in sub-freezing temperature. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Nothing is as New York as putting up billboards in Los Angeles and Miami saying “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Kudos to The Locker Room, a female-owned Brooklyn-based creative house, for the idea. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Restaurant workers are now eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. It took less than a day after announcing indoor dining’s that Governor Cuomo realized that sending people indoors to interact with a staff that is unvaccinated is the idea of an idiot. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Eastern Queens is a vaccine desert. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Yankee Stadium opens as a vaccination spot today with appointments available for Bronx residents. There are appointments available. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

• The MTA opened a new entrance to the Nostrand A/C station on Thursday. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• It’s pretty common advice in the city to avoid looking like a tourist by not looking up as you walk, that likely makes the Walk of Fame at Theater 80 on St. Marks one of the city’s most well-seen landmarks. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

12 new public art installations in February at Times Square, Rockefeller Center, the Port Authority and more. (Michelle Young Untapped New York)

• Real Estate Lust: A $2.65 million Crown Heights townhouse with a massive backyard and beautiful an en-suite bathroom with separate tub and shower. Sometimes a listing is just nice to look at because you’ve been inside your apartment for nearly a year and it’s just nice to think about being somewhere else for a moment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• No one should be surprised at a headline that reads “Rockaway ‘pizza nazi’ charged with harassing ex-girlfriend.” (David Brand for Queens Post)

The search for the impossibly perfect mozzarella stick with Big Stick Willy’s in the East Village. (Megan Pzetzhold for Grub Street)

• The discriminatory loitering law known as a ban on “walking while trans” has been repealed by the state’s legislature. State Senator Brad Hoylman of Manhattan and Assemmblymember Amy Paulin of Westchester were the bill’s lead sponsors. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Harriet and Thomas Truesdell House at 227 Duffield Street was designated an individual landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, ending a sixteen year-long fight to preserve the structure which is to believed had once been a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Ranked Choice Voting was unnecessary for the city’s first election utilizing it. Congrats to Democrat James Gennaro on winning the Queens City Council District 24 election. (Christine Chung for The City)

Meet the self-appointed and self-proclaimed Nut-Butter Don of Flatbush. (Emma Orlow for Grub Street)

• Remember the nets installed under the 7 train to prevent debris from falling onto pedestrians and vehicles? Well now they’re full of snow and are being described as “vast, pendulous sacks.” Apparently the MTA didn’t think about what happens when it snows when installing them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• The Hess spite triangle, my favorite spot in NYC, is for sale with the Village Cigars Building on the corner of Seventh Ave South and Christopher Street for $5.5 million. (Sophia Chang and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)`

• Pity the inhabitants of 432 Park, one of the wealthiest addresses and once the tallest residential buildings in the world, who complain about leaks, a creaky building, and elevator malfunctions. One prerequisite for living in the building is spending $15,000 a year at its private restaurant, overseen bu a Michelin-star chef. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

• Chicago pizza, Philly cheesesteaks, Nashville hot chicken, Detroit pizza, and now St. Louis wings? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Staten Island’s Republican Representative Nicole Malliotakis voted against certifying the 2020 election results, held a “Get Well Soon” rally for former President Trump, and one of her campaign operatives and longtime friend posted a video saying “Heil Hitler” on Facebook. Now Malliotakis has a new opponent. The Nicole is Complicit PAC raised $20,000 within four hours of launching its website to ensure that Malliotakis is a one term member of Congress. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

The filming locations for Netflix’s Unorthodox. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

• Patch wants to find NYC’s worst slush puddle. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden has launched a series of guided audio walks and installations, offering in-depth visits that remain socially distanced. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• Photos: Swoon’s sculpture and mobile performance stage The House Our Families Built, now at Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

• Two men being held on Rikers Island filed a lawsuit in that the state’s rules allowing immunizations for residents of other congregate settings like nursing homes, shelters and long-term care facilities while excluding incarcerated people is “arbitrary and capricious.” The lawsuit argues that all people in prisons and jails should be given access to vaccines. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• City Councilman Carlos Menchaca is seeking to remove Former President Trump’s name from city properties citing a Department of Buildings statute that regulates signs effect on “quality of life in a particular neighborhood.” (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

3 Super Bowl specials to order, even if you don’t watch the game. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

New York has been declared the best city in the country for pizza addicts. It isn’t an addiction, it’s a deep and undying appreciation! (Anna ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• Mayor de Blasio appointed a new head of the Department of Transportation and he’s a political ally with no experience in transportation. Commissioner Gutman, who now runs the $1.3 billion department, promised the installation of 10,000 bike parking racks. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

21 restaurants offering Valentine’s Day specials. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• The New York Botanical Garden announced new dates for Yayoi Kusama’s KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature exhibition, Saturday, April 10 to Sunday, October 31, 2021. (6sqft)

What you need to know about the District Attorney races in 2021. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Andrew Yang tested positive for Covid-19. He’s been the candidate for mayor who has held the most in-person events and already had to quarantine once due to a staffer testing positive. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

• Following up with the mayoral candidates that supported calls to Defund the Police when it was the politically expedient thing to say. Unsurprisingly, as candidates, everyone’s tone has changed. (Jeffery C. Mays and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

• Mayoral candidates Shaun Donovan, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Carlos Menchaca, Maya Wiley, and Ray McGuire support requiring NYPD officers to live in NYC. More than half of the NYPD’s uniformed officers currently live outside the city. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• Interview: Isaac Wright Jr. discusses his run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

A running list of new restaurants that opened in February. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Amanda Hatfield for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 20-21, 2020 – The “Not A Few Bad Apples” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: You can pee indoors again, you can buy the Gem Spa sign, the best meals of the year, the worst time to travel, and more

Today – Low: 34˚ High: 38˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

You can pee in restaurants again. It was less than an hour after Tuesday’s email that the city to reversed guidance that barred outdoor diners from coming inside if they needed to tinkle or drop a deuce. (Benjamin Hart for Grub Street)

22 years after the city said it would move the NYPD tow pound from Pier 76 at 36th St, which sits on state parkland. The state’s budget imposed a $3 million monthly fine on the city that starts in January for not moving the tow pound, which are on top of an additional $12 million in fines that already exist. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Believe it or not, the city’s Department of Investigation found that the problems in the NYPD that caused escalations of violence after the death of George Floyd by its officers was systemic and not caused by a few bad apples, that there was a racial tilt to how people were charged after arrested, and “lacked a clearly defined strategy” to respond to the protests. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The Legal Aid Society is suing the state for the release of information on the spread of COVID-19 in prisons, arguing that the Department of Corrections has failed to identify the facilities where officers have contracted the virus, making it impossible to trace how widespread the virus is within the prison system. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Critically-acclaimed restaurant Hunky Dory in Crown Heights opened the Hunky Depot, a small holiday market in the restaurant’s dining room. There’s room for six at a time so the lines may be as long as their pre-pandemic brunch lines. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The New York City Housing Authority is NYC’s worst landlord for the third year in a row, according to Public Advocate Jumaane Williams’s 100 worst landlords list. Williams lays the blame at the de Blasio administration’s feet for their management of the federal program. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Looking for a last-minute gift for someone who absolutely loves NYC? How about the Gem Spa sign? Gem Spa is auctioning off just about anything they could rip off the walls to those who can afford it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’re looking for some Christmas history in Manhattan, look no further than the seemingly-innocuous flagpole with a star on it in Madison Square Park. The Star of Hope markets the spot of NYC’s first Christmas tree lighting ceremony in 1912. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

13 places to find spectacular holiday decorations in NYC. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Apartment Lust: A $22 million, 7,400 square foot, seemingly endless townhouse on the Upper East Side with a roof deck, wine cellar, multiple smaller decks, and a tub big enough to look like a small pool. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Documentary: “I’ve had women who fondled my dog more than they fondled me” The Dogs of Manhattan from 1998, an often accidentally comedic look at dog walking culture in NYC in the late 90s. (Fat Building/YouTube)

The story of good boy Balto, who has a statue dedicated to him in Central Park, who famously helped bring the diphtheria antitoxin to Nome, Alaska 95 years ago this week seems fitting today. Balto’s statue is just east of the Willowdell Arch. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Subway station secrets. (GoGoSupertoe)

A look at Brooklyn-based photographer Katia Repina’s exhibition “Intimacy in the Time of Corona” at NYU’s Gallatin Galleries. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

Two bills passed by the City Council this week will increase protections for workers at fast-food companies. The first prohibits firing workers without “just cause” and the other requires that layoffs occur by seniority, protecting workers who have worked for companies longer. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Who wants to bet that the auction to destroy Donald Trump’s Atlantic City casino will raise more money than the GoFundMe to buy his childhood house? (Devin Gannon for 6qsft)

The city’s schools are making big changes to deal with the havoc caused by the pandemic, including eliminating academic screens for Middle schools, virtual performing art school auditions, widespread administration of the SHSAT, and eliminating district-based admissions preference. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

There’s been a spike in the number of reported puppy scams lately and this is a reminder that there are plenty of shelters across the city and region. Don’t be the asshole that buys a dog. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

The New York City Parks Department is looking to evict one of the city’s biggest processors of food waste at the end of the year. (Julie Levy for Bedford + Bowery)

The story of how the Blue Light Speak Cheesy went from operating out of an apartment window with paper bags and a pulley system to a full-on operation. (Amy Rowe for Grub Street)

Pernil at La Isla Cuchifritos, Gumbo at FieldTrip, and the rest of Ryan Sutton’s favorite dishes of 2020. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Roberta’s Burgie’s, “burger and fries concept” in East Williamsburg from the folks behind the pizza at Roberta’s is open for take out and delivery only. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Hats off to Ben Weiss, who took a ride on a double-decker tour bus this week. (Ben Weiss for Bedford + Bowery)

If you feel like you absolutely must travel this week, and you should absolutely without question not be doing that, the worst time to be on the road is 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 30. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

31 brunch spots with outdoor heat lamps. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 3, 2020 – The “A Bad Omen Washes Ashore at Jacob Riis Park” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Javits Center opens to COVID-19 patients, a takeout and delivery guide, 369,000 New Yorkers file for unemployment, Tekashi69 goes free, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Possible drizzle until evening.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚

The Governor Cuomo’s nipple piercing mystery may be solved? But also the mystery rages on. (Hudon Hongo for Gizmodo)

No matter who you are, if you’re sick or not, it’s time to wear a mask, a bandana, a balaclava, a Spider-Man mask, just cover your face with something if you go out in public. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A 28-foot-long humpback whale washed ashore Tuesday at Jacob Riis Park in Queens. If everything hadn’t already gone to hell, this might be a bad omen. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Just as the coronavirus season is expected to end, this year’s hurricane season is expected to be 40% more active than the average season. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Inside the USNS Comfort. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Javits Center now has 2,500 beds, up from 1,000, and has been approved for COVID-19 patients. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What happens if we run out of ventilators? While Governor Cuomo says “there’s no protocol,” there’s a 266-page document from 2015 available for download on the state’s website that lays it out step by step. Basically, it boils down to saving the most lives. (Gwynne Hogan and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Craving NYC without going outside? Here’s an exhaustive list of movies featuring Greenwich Village. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

The history of the Brooklyn Blackout cake. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

I linked to the wrong story yesterday giving hard numbers on COVID-19 infections by zip code, here’s a better breakdown of how many are sick per zip code in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Michelin-starred Eleven Madison Park is turning into a kitchen for Rethink Food, a city-based food nonprofit, thanks to “an undisclosed amount of funding” from American Express. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Rethink Food NYC is offering 30 restaurants $40,000 each to stay open and provide 24,000 meals per day for New Yorkers in need. Eleven Madison Park is not on the list. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds,” but also the postal service has been struggling to deliver the mail with some areas not receiving mail for days at a time due to a severe staffing shortage. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Maybe the last place you want to hang out in during a global pandemic that’s infected over a million people, but the longer the state is on PAUSE, the more outdoor space becomes a luxury. The case for Green-Wood Cemetery. (Nathan Kensinger for Curbed)

Photos: Sakura Park in the Bronx’s cherry blossoms are hitting their peak. It’s been so warm that the cherry blossoms across the city have been blooming. Time to steal a peek if you can find one. (HARLEM + BESPOKE)

A map of who’s open in Western Queens, with over 250 businesses that are open. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

A federal judge ordered Gaspar Avendano-Hernandez released from ICE’s custody. You might remember his arrest because Erick Diaz-Cruz his girlfriend’s son was shot in the face by an ICE officer while he was being arrested. Tragically, Diaz-Cruz did not survive. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re among the 369,000 New Yorkers who lost a job in the last week, you know all too well that attempting to apply for benefits is a full-time job in itself. (Daniel Moritz-Rabson for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s daily chats with New York and the nation are getting weird. He dedicated some of Thursday’s press conference to a chat with his brother, who is in quarantine after a COVID-19 diagnosis earlier in the week. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

Maps: New York City is so big (how big is it?) that you can fit the population of multiple cities inside each borough. Brooklyn? Chicago. Staten Island? Sacramento. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Quarantee is like a nightclub, except it all happens on Zoom. You’re charged a cover and somehow “bouncers” enforce a dress code and they even offer “private tables.” I’m at a loss for words. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Anyone else notice lots of masks and rubber gloves littering the streets? (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

It depends on who you believe, but the staff of Montefiore Medical Center may or may not have been given Yankees rain ponchos as personal protective gear for their shifts. (Brian M. Rosenthal and James Wagner for NY Times)

One of the inmates that was released to prevent further COVID-19 outbreaks in the city’s federal prisons? Tekashi69. (Melena Ryzik and Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

A federal judge struck down a portion of the state’s new rent laws that dealt with retroactive rent overcharge claims. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Video: “Typologies of New York City: A Crowdsourced Hyperlapse” 1,246 photos of NY to make one great video. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Do the animals in the Bronx Zoo know something has changed? (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Traffic to the city’s domestic violence website is up 7.8x for the first full week following the state’s declaration of PAUSE. There has been no increase in domestic violence calls to 911, which could mean domestic violence could be going unreported. Call 911 in an emergency, otherwise, the Domestic Violence hotline’s phone number is 1-800-621-4673 (HOPE). (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Mount Sinai researchers are tracking COVID-19 across New York City through a program called STOP COVID NYC. If you have any symptoms, you can participate and help track and predict smaller outbreaks. (Norwood News)

The happy haunts of Green-Wood Cemetery are open to the public for longer in new, expanded hours. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio greeted EMT and paramedics from across the country at Fort Totten Park Thursday morning as they prepared to help New York City’s overburdened emergency medical workers. (Alejandra ‘Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Residential and commercial real estate showings are considered “essential,” but showings can’t happen in person. Are you ready to buy an apartment based on a FaceTime call? (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan and E.B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

How the 2021 mayoral candidates have responded to the coronavirus. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)