The Briefly for November 17-19, 2020 – The “There Are No Consequences” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Cuomo works to undermind de Blasio (again), 2020 mall Santas are sadder than usual, teens are scarier than usual, the best Indian, and more

Today – Low: 31˚ High: 49˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Review: The new Yellow Rose in the East Village, which opens at 8 am on Sundays for breakfast tacos in addition to its Texas-inspired fare. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Video: Many of us aren’t getting to LaGuardia any time soon. For those of us not traveling, check out the airport’s new water show. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

“I think there has to be consequences for anyone who doesn’t wear a mask.” More hollow words from the mayor when asked about the NYPD not wearing masks. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

There’s a Twitter account dedicated to photos of the NYPD without masks. (@nypdmaskwatch)

The city is implementing new rules for outdoor dining, which include additional barriers, moving outdoor setups when it snows, making curbside seating barriers sturdier, and more. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The MTA is adding voices of “iconic New Yorkers” to subway announcements. (ShayeWeaver for Time Out)

This dystopian year will be capped off with mall Santas wearing plastic shields sitting behind plexiglass sheets. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Take a look at five zip codes that are testing over 5% for Covid-19. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s 3% positivity threshold will trigger a school shutdown, but Governor Cuomo is going on TV to undermine whatever confidence the city has left in MAyor de Blasio, saying the 3% threshold could change. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Also bandied about by Governor Cuomo during television interviews is shutting down indoor dining in NYC. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Seeing a group of teens on the subway during normal times? Scary. Seeing a group of teens on the subway during the pandemic? Terrifying. Teens ended October with a Covid-19 positivity rating of 3.9%. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

We’re getting a real look at what outdoor dining could look like this winter, as temperatures are expected to drop below freezing for the first time this season. (Ben Yakas and Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Own your own Ol’ Dirty Bastard action figure. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Gowanus Canal dredging is officially underway. 72,400 cubic yards of black mayonnaise are expected to be removed. Cleanup is expected to continue for at least another decade. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of things that will take a while, the city’s tourism industry isn’t projected to return to pre-pandemic levels until late 2024. Get ready for a lot of staycation advertising campaigns in the meantime. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Restoration on the Endale Arch in Prospect Park has been completed and the result is an absolutely beautiful sight. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Disney is teaming up with Roberta’s to offer Disney-themed pizzas for Thanksgiving. It is exceptionally weird to think that the “Donald” pizza includes any meat on it (it includes sausage). (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How did Mark Szuszkievicz, a Republican QAnon supporter, get so many votes in Coney Island’s Democratic district? (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

FIT offered “free” temporary housing to its laid-off dorm workers in late October, after they learned they would lose their jobs, health insurance, and homes in the residence halls. Some were paid less than $17,000 a year. Last week they learned the housing ain’t free. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

The best Indian restaurants in NYC. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, and Arden Shore for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 6-8, 2020 – The “3 Guarantees: Death, Taxes, and Cuomo vs de Blasio” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Schools will close in 9 city zip codes but not non-essential businesses, Bushwig, Andy King is out, where to watch sports outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 59˚ High: 70˚
Clear throughout the day.

On Saturday night, Street Riders NYC organized a protest bike ride against police brutality in Manhattan. In a scene that we’ve seen too many times this year, an SUV drove into the prrotest, sending multiple people to the hospital. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Photos: Without the ability to put together their usual festival, Bushwig took over Maria Hernandez Park on Saturday afternoon. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Cuomo announced that on Tuesday, he will close every school, childcare center, and pre-K site inside the nine zip codes with testing rates of Covid-19 positive above 3%. The schools will remain closed for at least two weeks. This affects about 82,000 students. The mayor wanted to wait until Wednesday but was overridden by the governor. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The closings may go beyond schools. This could spell the end of indoor dining in 20 zip codes, but for now, only schools will be closing in nine zip codes. Indoor dining is less than one week old. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

If you have confusion about this, you’re not alone and there’s a good reason for that. Mayor de Blasio is acting as if he’s still going to close down non-essential businesses in the nine zip codes. To be specific, he does not have the authority to shut down businesses, only Governor Cuomo does and Cuomo is skeptical of de Blasio’s plans. Once again we are stuck between their pissing contest, getting pissed off and pissed on at the same time. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYPD issued a directive for its officers to wear masks, warning officers could face disciplinary action. You can report officers without masks to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, who will forward them to the police. It’s probably better for them to have a record of the complaints than the NYPD. (Ashley Southall and Michael Gold for NY Times)

The restaurant at Central Park’s Loeb Boathouse is closing and all 163 workers have been let go. It seems like if you wanted to recreate the scene from When Harry Met Sally, it’s another thing that Covid-19 has taken from you. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Maggie O’Neill, 61, of Murray Hill, Queens died and two men were badly injured after a seaplane crashed into an East River pier near the Throgs Neck Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The colors of the terra-cotta mosaic subway station signs have meanings. Specifically, when they change has meaning. (Nicola Saraniero for Untapped New York)

This is why we can’t have nice things: Two karaoke bars in Flushing were shut down for violating Covid-19 restrictions with dozens of people inside each. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

What the hell is going on and why was this man dumping eels into Prospect Park Lake? (Jack Denton for Curbed)

Congrats to Amy O’Sullivan, a nurse at Wyckoff hospital, for landing on the Time 100 under “icons.” She treated the first COVID-19 patient at the hospital, who became the city’s first death in early March. (Katie Couric for Time)

A judge barred NYSC and Lucille Roberts from charging members dues after they were sued by the attorney general for charging customers during the pandemic. If your “home” gym is still closed, they are barred from charging you. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The City Council voted to expel Andy King over sexual harassment, finance, and discrimination violations. He’s the first councilmember to be removed in the history of the City Council. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Sentient ball of spiders and petroleum jelly Eric Trump was questioned under oath on Monday as part of a civil investigation by Attorney General Letitia James’s office into whether the Trump family’s real estate company committed fraud. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Radio Free Brooklyn will display a massive mural titled “Wall of Lies,” encompassing over 20,000 mistruths told by Donald Trump since he first took office. (Natalie Colarossi for Bushwick Daily)

Interview: Assemblymember-elect Emily Gallagher on assuming office in January after defeating incumbent Joe Lentol. (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Where to watch sports outdoors. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Joe for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 6, 2020 – The “NYC is Horny for Books” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the mayor firing Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the MTA’s bad options to continue operating, where to eat in Queens, can you afford an apartment, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 81˚
Rain overnight.

Liquored up ice cream is now legal in New York. The new liquor ice cream can be alcoholic up to 5% by volume. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photos and Video: Inside an abandoned Brooklyn warehouse and a look at the treasures left behind. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

In parts of the city, the fireworks stopped shortly after July 4. Apparently Norwood didn’t get the message because there was a 45-minute fireworks display over the weekend in a memorial for James Wimmer, who was a lifelong resident, on what would have been his 45th birthday. In 45 minutes, how many police showed up? Exactly zero. (Norwood News)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to know that he fired Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the city’s former health commissioner, and she did not resign in protest. Yes, it makes total sense to fire your top health official in the middle of a health crisis. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city’s libraries’ grab-and-go service has proven one thing: New Yorkers are horny for reading. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Why did Mayor de Blasio push Dr. Oxiris Barbot out in the middle of a pandemic? He says he wants the “atmosphere of unity.” Nothing says unity like people quitting your administration in frustration and forcing out the top health official in the middle of a health emergency. That must also be why you keep around NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, who shit talks in public. Bill, we all know you’re a simp for cops. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are six botanical gardens you can visit in the city this summer. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A look through the archives of the Brooklyn Eagle at Irving Kaufman’s photography, with a focus this week on NYC construction in the 1930’s. (Phil Kaufman for Brooklyn Eagle)

RIP Pete Hamill, a celebrated NYC reporter whose work was featured in nearly any publication you can name. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

There were still nearly 100,000 customers without power after Tropical Storm Isaias on Wednesday night as ConEd reports it may take days to restore power across the city. Governor Cuomo directed the Department of Public Service to investigate ConEd’s response to the storm. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you thought that the city’s bootleg bartenders selling drinks from coolers was going to dwindle in the pandemic, you’re wrong. (Avery Stone for Eater)

With Isaias fresh in mind and with repairs from Hurricane Sandy still going, it’s a good time to examine the loopholes that allow home sellers from disclosing if their home may flood or not. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Where to get takeout and delivery in Queens, updated for August. (Eater)

It’s like a “Why I’m leaving New York” personal essay, but it’s about a restaurant. Why the Banty Rooster is leaving New York. (Matthew Sedacca with Delores Tronco-DePierro and John DiPierro for Grub Street)

The city will be installing checkpoints to identify out-of-state travelers who are required to quarantine and handing out fines up to $10,000 for violations. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced firings of 79 employees, 181 furloughs, and 93 voluntary retirements. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

This is a good link to have when someone asks you if you think they can afford an apartment in NYC: What is a good rent-to-income ratio in NYC. I’ve always used the 40:1 rule, but this goes a bit deeper. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

“If you’ve never been to courts in New York City, even the newest buildings are teeming with people and their germs. Just to call a single case, there have to be at least 10 people in the room. One judge. One clerk. One court reporter. Four court officers. One prosecutor. One defense attorney. One person who stands accused of a crime and possibly their family members. So when OCA tells us that it will only have 10 cases on at once, that doesn’t mean just 10 people confined to one courtroom, but many, many more, all at risk of contracting and spreading the same virus that killed so many, including my colleague.”
-Martha Lineberger, public defender for the Legal Aid Society, Lives Hang in the Balance as Courts Resume In-Person Work for City Limits

Welcome to the first day after Governor Cuomo’s eviction moratorium is over. Without protections form the state, this could be the start of mass evictions and a huge jump in preventable homelessness in the city. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

NYC will dedicate a team of contact tracers to investigate coronavirus cases in schools, but based on the city’s contact tracing program so far (reminder: the NY Times called it a “disaster”), don’t get your hopes too high. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Go home, NY Times, you’re drunk. Headline: New York’s Sidewalk Prophets Are Heirs of the Lascaux Cave Artisans (Seph Rodney for NY Times)

According to RentHop’s rental report, rents dropped 5% year-over-year in Manhattan. (RentHop)

A rundown of all of the bad options the MTA has now that it seems clear that the federal government is not going to be helping and congestion pricing isn’t happening anytime soon. Reduced service with raised fares? Check. Signal upgrade delays? Check. Shelving new construction? Check. It’s like a Choose Your Own Adventure book, but every choice past page one is bad. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best places to eat sushi outside” is a very 2020 headline. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)