The Briefly for October 4-5 2020 – The “Is It Finally Time To Find A New Apartment?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The mayor is robbing the city to pay for his ferries, delivering comforting words with your pizza, Hillary Clinton talks art, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Clear throughout the day.

Have you been seeing comedy shows popping up in unconventional places? Well, it’s because comedy is technically illegal anywhere food and drinks are sold. (Sasha von Olderhausen)

The $100 million cut to the Sanitation department seems to have hit the Bronx the hardest. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Is this a good time to find a new apartment? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Yeah, rents might be seeing a temporary drop, but it seems like New York City is still on its way to having the highest rent in the country. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Human Rights Watch report called the NYPD’s actions against protesters on June 4 in Mott Haven “intentional, planned, and unjustified.” The mayor continues to defend the NYPD’s actions, but finally admitted the NYPD’s targeting and assault of legal observers was wrong. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayorally controlled city Economic Development Corporation diverted tens of millions of dollars in rent receipts from publicly owned Times Square real estate holdings to help operate the costly NYC Ferry system. In the middle of a pandemic and budget crisis, maybe it’s not the best time to steal from the city to pay for Mayor de Blasio’s pet projects. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The MTA honored Medgar Evers by renaming the Franklin Ave and President St stations after the civil rights icon and the college that bears his name. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s been enough happening this week before Rock Moranis was randomly punched in the head by a random attacker on Friday morning. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

If you need some comforting words, try ordering from Vinnie’s. In addition to your pizza you can get comforting words for $1. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

The house where Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny was written in is in Greenwich Village. On March 5, 1967, it was put on a flatbed truck on the Upper East Side and moved to where it sits today. (Sydney Rose for Atlas Obscura)

The MTA is getting some work done ahead of schedule at the Sutphin Blvd.-Archer Ave E train station, taking advantage of the moment’s low ridership. The work will conclude by November 2. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

“The local government’s responsibility is to enforce the law.” – Governor Cuomo is making more threats towards the city, this time accompanied by a $10,000 daily fine for lack of enforcement. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Add the nearly 70-year-old Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side to the list of restaurants that have closed in the pandemic. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Things are awful. It’s okay to talk about art sometimes. Here’s an interview with Hillary Clinton about her love of Broadway. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A guide to better understanding the city’s Covid-19 data. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Something strange is happening in Boro Park when it comes to Covid-19. Anonymous Yiddish robocalls are targeting Boro Park and Williamsburg urging people against getting tested “as this drives up the numbers,” in the Bobov Hasidic community, leaders are encouraging anyone who already had the virus to get tested to also drive the numbers down, and there are reports that some providers are withholding reporting test results. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alright, it’s currently flu season and it’s been Covid-19 season since February. Here’s how to identify different symptoms of either. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

The biryani delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

This story is about how the governor sent Trump a “recovery basket” of buffalo wings, bagels, and cheesecake, but also did you know that Cuomo declared the official state snack to be Greek yogurt in 2014? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Holy shit, Cellino & Barnes’ Steve Barnes died in a plane crash. (Juliana Kim for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s Third Avenue claimed another life as a bicyclist was hit and killed by a motorcyclist on Saturday morning. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Staten Island to NYC regarding budget woes: “Don’t tread on me.” (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

“The time to address this challenge is now – before the area’s growth and changes cause even more displacement. Industry City will grow and change even without their proposed rezoning. The campus will continue to attract more jobs and more residents. We cannot pretend these changes aren’t occurring. Sunset Park must vigorously preserve the affordable units it has, better protect tenants and begin to support development without displacement that creates truly and permanently affordable housing.”
-Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee & Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Industry City is dead, but Sunset Park still needs help for amNewYork Metro

NYC has a corn maze. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Zoo’s holiday light show is returning this November for something to do outdoors while we’re still locked indoors. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything is canceled, so here are 8 places to personally celebrate Oktoberfest. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Sarah for today’s featured photo from the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano.

The Briefly for September 18-19, 2020 – The “Two Protests Fall in Love” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: School openings delayed, the most dangerous ride in Coney Island, details on SNL’s new season, a guide to eating outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 69˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 50˚ High: 65˚

Human Turd Eric Trump has agreed to be interviewed by the state’s attorney general into the financing of Trump properties, but only after the presidential election. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

The latest figures has NYC’s unemployment rate at 16% compared to the rest of the country’s 8.4%. When the rest of the country’s unemployment rate was 3.5% in February, it was 3.4% in the city. (Greg David for The City)

Photos: At this point, it’s anyone’s guess why people are protesting outside Mayor de Blasio’s home. Actually, two independent protests met outside Gracie Mansion, and like a 2020 romantic comedy, they came together over their common hatred of the mayor. (Photos by Denice Flores Almendares for Gothamist)

In an almost cruel move, the mayor is still walking about laying off 22,000 city workers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Three months after Mayor de Blasio announced that the NYPD would stop ticketing street vendors, the NYPD took to Twitter to boast about ticketing street vendors. Christine Chung for The Dity)

Mayor de Blasio halted the decision to evict hundreds of homeless men from a temporary shelter in a hotel on the Upper West Side, but families had already started being moved out of other shelters to make room for them. A perfect de Blasio decision, no positive impact but plenty of repercussions. The worst of everything. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about the de Blasio caused Upper West Side homeless shelter saga. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It only took a few days after business leaders sent him a letter asking him to do exactly this, but our simp mayor is now starting to talk about how companies should be sending people back to their offices. Do not be fooled by the low “rate of infection” that city and state officials throw around. The effective reproduction rate in New York still indicates that the virus is spreading and not diminishing. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The NY Taxi Workers union shut down the Brooklyn Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and FDR Drive on Thursday in a protest demanding debt forgiveness for cabbies hit hard by the pandemic. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos: Inside Keith Haring’s last apartment in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A firetruck t-boned an ambulance early on Thursday morning in Brooklyn, killing the man in the ambulance and injuring 12. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the New York yoga studio dead? (Ted Alcorn for NY Times)

On Tuesday, I introduced a City Council bill [read it here] to clear the red tape that’s allowed for racially biased, anti-pedestrian policies. The bill will effectively decriminalize “jaywalking,” which, it should be noted, was a term invented by the auto industry to shame pedestrians.
– Costa Constantinides, Astoria’s representative in City Council, Here’s Why We Should Decriminalize ‘Jaywalking’ for Streetsblog

The hopes for the Industry City rezoning hinges on the owners adding 20,000 new jobs, but even members of the service workers union that represents the current workers are losing faith in the owners. The union technically supports the rezoning, but they still haven’t reached an agreement with the site’s management since it opened in April of 2019. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

What’s the most dangerous ride in Coney Island? It might be the ferry if the city’s chosen location gets built. The city’s location is in a dangerously polluted creek that also has a few unexploded bombs sitting at the bottom of it. The locals if you could imagine, arent happy with the location. (The Coney Island Blog)

Remember I asked if the $50 fines on the subway for not wearing a mask? It took ONE day for someone to film two police officers not wearing masks in a subway station and being shits about it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: A hazy NYC as the smoke from the West Coast has reached the east coast. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

North Brooklyn environmentalists and Pratt Institute have created an interactive map charting historic environmental pollution in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, and adjacent neighborhoods. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When SNL starts up again in October they will have a live crowd and Jim Carry will be portraying Joe Biden, Maya Rudolph will return as Kamala Harris, and Alec Baldwin will also be back for the new season. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sam Moyer’s Doors for Doris, built from leftover pieces of stone from around the world and cemented into doors can now be found at the Doris C. Freedman Plaza entrance to Central Park at 60th St. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Will the Hudson Yards need a second bailout? The city’s already provided $5.6 billion in tax breaks in hopes of making the money back. Sounds like a crazy idea? We already bailed it out after the 2008 crash. (Neil de Mause for Gothamist)

The city is opening a new lab to process Covid-19 tests and cut down wait times as school is almost in session and indoor dining is scheduled to start at the end of the month. The hope is that the lab will eventually process 40,000 tests a day. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

How to get a virus test result in under 48 hours. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Listen, just get a flu shot. At this point, let’s get the upper hand on any illness we possibly can. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio are off the state’s quarantine travel list, but Puerto Rico has been added. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Apartment Porn: Chloe Sevigny’s $3.25 million prewar Park Slope apartment overlooking Prospect Park is for sale. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

A yeshiva in Queens continued holding in-person classes this week after the Mayor’s Office announced the school was shut down after more than a dozen students tested positive for coronavirus. Health officials returned and shut the school down a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the city ready for electric scooter ride-sharing? (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

7 things we still don’t know about the school year in NYC, but really should. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look into how the city’s “Situation Room” for Covid-19 monitoring at schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Here are the 56 schools with positive Covid-19 cases before the school year even starts in person. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city already delayed in-person classes once and now they’re doing it again. Students will come back into classes in phases, starting with younger children first. I was told by a friend that this is the plan that the UFT suggested weeks ago but the mayor balked at. High schools will open on October 1. Always a last-second decision from this city. (Elisa Shapiro for NY Times)

Some students, even if they’re participating in “in-person” classes, will be logging on and actually having their classes virtually while sitting in classrooms. The high number of students that opted out of in-person classes is causing a staffing problem. All of the inconvenience and fear of sending your child to a school building with none of the benefits of them learning in a classroom! (Yoav Gonen from The City and Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The city’s blended approach to education will cost an additional $32 million a week. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

With fall here, can we still go apple picking? (Eliane Glusac for NY Times)

The governor used the figure that the MTA lost $300 million due to fare evasion a year to justify hiring 500 new NYPD officers to patrol the subways. Turns out that number is very wrong. Can we have our money back instead of these subway cops? (Jose Martinez for The City)

The ultimate guide to outdoor dining. (Eater)

Thanks to Sandra for today’s featured photo of some turtle friends!

The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!