The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 6, 2019 – The “Where Have All The Duane Reades Gone” Edition

Election results, the ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans, ICE continues to make courthouse arrests, the best bear, never enough food halls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

In a new effort by the MTA and law enforcement to crack down on fare evasion, New York City reportedly opened a $500 million decoy subway station this week to catch turnstile jumpers. (The Onion)

Something is wrong when even Duane Reade is reducing its footprint in the city. (Gothamist)

The 2019 New York City 40 Under 40 Rising Stars. (City and State)

Only 1.14% of the registered voters in the city turned out to vote early this election. Come on, people! Let’s pick it up next time around. (amNewYork)

Jumaane Williams was re-elected as the city’s public advocate with 74.13% of the vote. (Patch)

All five ballot referendums were emphatically answered by voters as “YES!” Ranked-choice voting was approved by 72.94%. Civilian Complaint Review Board reform was approved by 77.05%. Ethics and governance approved with 77.05%. Establishing a rainy-day find was approved by 70.51%. and ULURP changes were approved by 75.83%. (amNewYork)

Melinda Katz is Queens’ new District Attorney. (QNS.com)

Central Park will be adding signage to acknowledge that in 1857 the city kicked the mostly African American inhabitants of Seneca Village off their land in order to create the park. (Curbed)

David’s Briskey House in Bed-Stuy is a legendary Jewish deli run by a Yemeni, proving that food belongs to no one. (Atlas Obscura)

The NYC filming locations for Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. (Untapped New York)

Alanis Morisette will be celebrating the opening of the ‘Jagged Little Pill’ Broadway musical with an acoustic performance of the album at the Apollo Theater. (Brooklyn Vegan)

There will be a wall in the Gowanus Canal, and National Grid is going to pay for it. It’s true, as a part of the Superfund cleanup, National Grid will build a wall to prevent liquid tar from re-contaminating the canal on the old Fulton Manufactured Gas Plant. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: A feature on Macon Hardware in Bed-Stuy, and Clara Hayes, the 92-year-old unofficial mayor of the block and proprietor, who runs the place. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re purchasing health insurance from the marketplace, you’ve got until December 15 to enroll for coverage for January 1. (amNewYork)

What to do in the Bronx that’s not baseball, the zoo or the Botanical Garden. (6sqft)

Don’t say Alec Baldwin punched you if Alec Baldwin didn’t actually punch you. (Gothamist)

Your reward for voting is this series of adorable videos of Sonya the brown bear acting like a little puppy when seeing her former caretaker. (Gothamist)

Are there enough food halls in Midtown? Never! Here come two more. (6sqft)

A list of demands for Dermot Shea, the city’s new police commissioner. (Streetsblog)

When Mayor de Blasio announced Dermot Shea was to be the city’s next police commissioner, he passed over Benjamin Tucker, the second-highest-ranking overall and the top black police official. This is the third time that the mayor passed over Tucker for the position, instead, he picked Benjamin Bratton, James O’Neill, and now Dermot Shea. (NY Times)

If crime declines, should the number of cops follow it? (Gothamist)

ICE has continued to arrest immigrants at courthouses in New York. The Immigrant Defense Project has counted 112 incidents and sightings and that agents are ignoring the state’s rule that prevents federal agents from making arrests in courthouses without a warrant. (amNewYork)

The Dreamland Roller Disco has landed in a new Brooklyn location. The latest incarnation is at City Point in Downtown Brooklyn. (Time Out)

The ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for November 1, 2019 – The “You Can’t Stop the Christmas Juggernaut” Edition

The weekend subway disruptions, everything about the 2019 NYC Marathon, MLB and Nike are screwing the Bronx, photos from Halloween, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend the clocks turn back an hour. Make sure to remember that on Sunday when looking at all your non-internet connected devices.

Getting around this weekend will continue to be tricky with the 3, 4, 6, 7, D, E, F, N, and R all with diversions. Maybe it’s best to follow the lead of the marathon and run where you need to go. Check the subways before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 NYC marathon. (Time Out)

Use this custom marathon subway map to find your way around the city on Sunday. (6sqft)

10 fun things to look for along the NYC Marathon route. (Untapped New York)

The best places to watch the marathon. (NY Times)

The corpse of Halloween isn’t even cool yet and the Winter Village at Bryant Park is officially open. (Time Out)

12 new public art installations to see in November. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: West 69th St is a nice block that is very into Halloween. (Gothamist)

These political pumpkins spell out a simple message in the Village. (The Villager)

The story of how a sewing machine repair shop in the garment district run by a man with a penchant for collecting has become a trove of forgotten treasures and how he fights back the tourists that have no idea what his shop does. (NY Times)

There aren’t enough apartments in NYC. While that statement seems like the ramblings of a lunatic, it’s true according to “The Geography of Jobs” report, which shows that the city needs more housing to keep up with its explosive job growth. As a result, housing stock is increasing in Connecticut and New Jersey and more people are commuting. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball and Nike are working together to screw the Bronx. After city taxpayers paid $1.2 billion for Yankee Stadium, MLB and Nike cut a deal that only allows officially licensed MLB merchandise to be sold at “premium distribution points” near a stadium, which would freeze out nearly every business near Yankee Stadium from selling anything MLB-related. The Yankees’ COO has been working with MLB to resolve the issue, but as it stands right now eight businesses may find themselves up River Ave without a paddle. (amNewYork)

publicly said “something doesn’t fit” when it comes to Epstein’s death, stoking the interest of a million YouTube conspiracy theorists. (Politico)

It only took the mayor a day to roll back the heavily supported news that sidewalks on Fifth Ave would be expanded to make way for holiday window onlookers, saying that he hadn’t signed off on the idea yet. (amNewYork)

RIP Barneys. Sold for $270 million in bankruptcy court. (The Real Deal)

This is not how you play Untitled Goose Game. It is, however, how you capture a goose named Calista in Central Park with lead toxicity. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The city’s foie gras ban is, of course, going to be challenged in court. (Grub Street)

Say hello to New York, and the world’s, richest billionaires. (Patch)

Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl is leaving his job with coincidental timing after the Mother Frances Cabrini statue embarrassment. (Patch)

New data shows the NYPD rarely ever does anything with the honesty findings from the Civilian Complaint Review Board. 61 False Official Statement findings, which determine that an officer lied to investigators, were submitted and only five were substantiated. Another good reason to vote yes on question 2 in this year’s election. You can vote early through Sunday. (Gothamist)

Is a Wegmans a Wegmans without a Sub Shop? No serious, I don’t know the answer because I’m not someone who is insane for Wegmans. (Grub Street)

Take the stairs. More than 1,000 New York City elevators still need new inspections after faulty contractors gave them sub-par checks. (Patch)

The Times, always a few steps behind, has descended down the story of the Joker stairs between Shakespeare and Jerome Avenues. (NY Times)

10 raw bar picks. (Grub Street)

thanks to reader Mary for today’s fetured image!